Thursday, May 4, 2017

Amazon Ads, A Second Try

After reading the excellent advice provided by authors C. L. Murray (on his blog) and Shawn Inmon (at Indies Unlimited) regarding advertising books on Amazon, I decided to give Amazon Ads another try while incorporating their helpful suggestions. If you recall, my first foray into Amazon ads was a complete miss. Here's a step-by-step chronological list of how I constructed my latest Amazon ad (which starts running today):

  1. At the suggestion of C. L. Murray, I selected a Product Display Ad (last time, I chose the other ad option).
  2. For the ebook to advertise, I chose Crimson & Cream (book one of the trilogy, instead of book two, like last time). I'm hoping the first book of the series may be more enticing to potential readers, and lead to follow-up sales of my other book(s).
  3. I chose to target "By Product" instead of "By Interest." This was my own intuitive choice in thinking that buyers of similar books are a better target than customers based on interest categories. This is something I can experiment with in future ads.
  4. To target readers who may be interested in Crimson & Cream, I selected 10 top-selling fantasy books from the same Kindle categories that Crimson & Cream is listed in (Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Science Fiction & Fantasy > Fantasy > Coming of Age and > Sword & Sorcery). These ten will be the books where my ad will display to potential customers. I settled on 10 books based on my own hunch. I'll be curious to see if this ends up being too few or too many.
  5. I checked the box that asks "Automatically extend your reach to include related products, such as those frequently bought with your book (recommended)." I don't see how this could be a bad thing.
  6. Named the Campaign with the book title and ad run date, for easy identification from my other ads (this is for my own dashboard identification, and doesn't display on the ad).
  7. Set the Cost-per-click bid (CPC) at $0.21. The CPC is your maximum bid amount, but you only get charged whatever it takes to beat out the next highest ad bid, so your average click cost will be lower than the CPC you set. C. L. Murray indicated that "Product Display ads with a Cost Per Click Bid of around 20c and a monthly budget of $400 often result in an actual Cost Per Click of 2c-5c and monthly expenditure of far less than the maximum I set." Assuming my cost per click ends up being 5 cents, I will need to average approximately one sale per every 40 clicks to break even. Based on C. L.'s experience, this target is within reason (but optimistic).
  8. Set the Campaign Budget at $200.
  9. Set the campaign to run for 2 months.
  10. Selected "Spread campaign evenly over its duration" (C. L. Murray's advice).
  11. Typed in my ad headline: "Hunted by Mercenaries and Monsters." (This will appear on two of the three ad types generated).
  12. Pasted in my ad's blurb text: "A luckless teen orphan risks his life to reclaim his stolen birthright. Free to read in Kindle Unlimited." (the Kindle Unlimited line was Shawn Inmon's suggestion).
  13. Previewed my ad in all three sizes (see one example below) and made any necessary tweaks.
  14. Hit "Submit campaign for review." (Amazon states it may take up to 72 hours to approve, though my ad was approved in about a day).
  15. Wait patiently for the cash to roll in. 

Based on Shawn's article, I'm hoping for one click-through per 1,000 impressions. In my first ad, I only received about 400 impressions total, and no click-throughs, so this time, I'm hoping a larger budget, featuring the first book in the series, and a different ad type will garner more impressions. Regarding the 1-in-1,000 click-through target, Shawn states "Too much lower than that and Amazon will stop serving your ad, no matter how high you bid, because readers are not responding to it, and relevance is a big part of the algorithm that decides how and where your book appears." 

As always, I'll keep you updated on how well this ad performs and share my 'lessons learned.' If you have any personal advice or tips on Amazon ads, I'd like to hear about them, and would be grateful if you'd share your experience.

As a follow-up to a previous post, I unpublished Crimson & Cream from Smashwords and enrolled in Amazon's KDP Select, so that Crimson & Cream could also be free to read in Kindle Unlimited.

Author Update: My editor is over half-way through her second read of Warlock & Wyrm, and is scheduled to finish by next Thursday. I've already fixed a couple plot holes she found, so hopefully, I can do a final polish and send the ARC to my beta readers in June. If you're interested in getting an ARC for a beta-read, please let me know.

2017 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2017, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Amazon Ads, A Second Try
link : Amazon Ads, A Second Try

Read Also


2017

After reading the excellent advice provided by authors C. L. Murray (on his blog) and Shawn Inmon (at Indies Unlimited) regarding advertising books on Amazon, I decided to give Amazon Ads another try while incorporating their helpful suggestions. If you recall, my first foray into Amazon ads was a complete miss. Here's a step-by-step chronological list of how I constructed my latest Amazon ad (which starts running today):

  1. At the suggestion of C. L. Murray, I selected a Product Display Ad (last time, I chose the other ad option).
  2. For the ebook to advertise, I chose Crimson & Cream (book one of the trilogy, instead of book two, like last time). I'm hoping the first book of the series may be more enticing to potential readers, and lead to follow-up sales of my other book(s).
  3. I chose to target "By Product" instead of "By Interest." This was my own intuitive choice in thinking that buyers of similar books are a better target than customers based on interest categories. This is something I can experiment with in future ads.
  4. To target readers who may be interested in Crimson & Cream, I selected 10 top-selling fantasy books from the same Kindle categories that Crimson & Cream is listed in (Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Science Fiction & Fantasy > Fantasy > Coming of Age and > Sword & Sorcery). These ten will be the books where my ad will display to potential customers. I settled on 10 books based on my own hunch. I'll be curious to see if this ends up being too few or too many.
  5. I checked the box that asks "Automatically extend your reach to include related products, such as those frequently bought with your book (recommended)." I don't see how this could be a bad thing.
  6. Named the Campaign with the book title and ad run date, for easy identification from my other ads (this is for my own dashboard identification, and doesn't display on the ad).
  7. Set the Cost-per-click bid (CPC) at $0.21. The CPC is your maximum bid amount, but you only get charged whatever it takes to beat out the next highest ad bid, so your average click cost will be lower than the CPC you set. C. L. Murray indicated that "Product Display ads with a Cost Per Click Bid of around 20c and a monthly budget of $400 often result in an actual Cost Per Click of 2c-5c and monthly expenditure of far less than the maximum I set." Assuming my cost per click ends up being 5 cents, I will need to average approximately one sale per every 40 clicks to break even. Based on C. L.'s experience, this target is within reason (but optimistic).
  8. Set the Campaign Budget at $200.
  9. Set the campaign to run for 2 months.
  10. Selected "Spread campaign evenly over its duration" (C. L. Murray's advice).
  11. Typed in my ad headline: "Hunted by Mercenaries and Monsters." (This will appear on two of the three ad types generated).
  12. Pasted in my ad's blurb text: "A luckless teen orphan risks his life to reclaim his stolen birthright. Free to read in Kindle Unlimited." (the Kindle Unlimited line was Shawn Inmon's suggestion).
  13. Previewed my ad in all three sizes (see one example below) and made any necessary tweaks.
  14. Hit "Submit campaign for review." (Amazon states it may take up to 72 hours to approve, though my ad was approved in about a day).
  15. Wait patiently for the cash to roll in. 

Based on Shawn's article, I'm hoping for one click-through per 1,000 impressions. In my first ad, I only received about 400 impressions total, and no click-throughs, so this time, I'm hoping a larger budget, featuring the first book in the series, and a different ad type will garner more impressions. Regarding the 1-in-1,000 click-through target, Shawn states "Too much lower than that and Amazon will stop serving your ad, no matter how high you bid, because readers are not responding to it, and relevance is a big part of the algorithm that decides how and where your book appears." 

As always, I'll keep you updated on how well this ad performs and share my 'lessons learned.' If you have any personal advice or tips on Amazon ads, I'd like to hear about them, and would be grateful if you'd share your experience.

As a follow-up to a previous post, I unpublished Crimson & Cream from Smashwords and enrolled in Amazon's KDP Select, so that Crimson & Cream could also be free to read in Kindle Unlimited.

Author Update: My editor is over half-way through her second read of Warlock & Wyrm, and is scheduled to finish by next Thursday. I've already fixed a couple plot holes she found, so hopefully, I can do a final polish and send the ARC to my beta readers in June. If you're interested in getting an ARC for a beta-read, please let me know.

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

2017 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2017, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title :
link :

Read Also


2017

[097khV]

Thursday, April 20, 2017

A Post About Virtute

I wrote a Google+ post several months ago about how I love the aspect of storytelling through song, and a shared a link of a timeless Paul Kelly tune titled To Her Door. Well, last week I stumbled across last fall's release by John K. Samson, the lead singer of the (most likely defunct) band The Weakerthans. On John's latest album, Winter Wheat, he included two songs that finish the story of Virtute (yes, that's how it's spelled) the Cat. Plea From A Cat Named Virtute appeared on The Weakerthans' 2003 album Reconstruction Site and is told from the cat's point of view. It happens to be one of my favorite songs.

Over the years, John wrote three more songs in this sad saga of a frustrated feline and his flawed human who struggles with substance abuse. It amazes me how a fictional story set to music can be so powerfully compelling and feel like a punch in the gut at the same time.

I thought of writing more about the saga here, but discovered two wonderful blog posts about Virtute the Cat and John K. Samson, and instead of being derivative, I'm just going to post links to each blog with the hope you give them a read. They're much more eloquent, heartfelt, and informative than what I'd envisioned putting together:


A gentleman named Matthew Myers graciously strung these four songs together with lyrics and posted them on YouTube, and the link is below. Note; if you didn't read the blog links above, the third song is from the human's point of view. If you love great songwriting, storytelling, and music, give it a listen. TRIGGER WARNING - if you possess a soft heart or a love for animals, you may be in tears by the end. I was.

2017 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2017, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : A Post About Virtute
link : A Post About Virtute

Read Also


2017

I wrote a Google+ post several months ago about how I love the aspect of storytelling through song, and a shared a link of a timeless Paul Kelly tune titled To Her Door. Well, last week I stumbled across last fall's release by John K. Samson, the lead singer of the (most likely defunct) band The Weakerthans. On John's latest album, Winter Wheat, he included two songs that finish the story of Virtute (yes, that's how it's spelled) the Cat. Plea From A Cat Named Virtute appeared on The Weakerthans' 2003 album Reconstruction Site and is told from the cat's point of view. It happens to be one of my favorite songs.

Over the years, John wrote three more songs in this sad saga of a frustrated feline and his flawed human who struggles with substance abuse. It amazes me how a fictional story set to music can be so powerfully compelling and feel like a punch in the gut at the same time.

I thought of writing more about the saga here, but discovered two wonderful blog posts about Virtute the Cat and John K. Samson, and instead of being derivative, I'm just going to post links to each blog with the hope you give them a read. They're much more eloquent, heartfelt, and informative than what I'd envisioned putting together:


A gentleman named Matthew Myers graciously strung these four songs together with lyrics and posted them on YouTube, and the link is below. Note; if you didn't read the blog links above, the third song is from the human's point of view. If you love great songwriting, storytelling, and music, give it a listen. TRIGGER WARNING - if you possess a soft heart or a love for animals, you may be in tears by the end. I was.

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Leaving Smashwords and Other Tidbits

If you hadn't noticed, I gave my blog a facelift, mainly because Google offered some new free Blogger templates and you know I can't resist free stuff (or leaving well enough alone). If you spot any issues or can't find something that you liked on the old blog page, please let me know, and I will fix it.

All right then, on to the main topic. With the release of the third and final book of my trilogy looming on the horizon, I've decided to retool my marketing strategy. Because the majority of the ebooks I've sold have been through Amazon, I want to try maximizing the options available through KDP Select and plan on enrolling all three books through this exclusive Amazon service (currently only Mirrors & Mist is enrolled). Unfortunately, this means I'll have to pull Crimson & Cream from Smashwords.

I like nearly everything about Smashwords - the publishing help, multiple sales outlets, the 'meatgrinder' book formatter, free self-help guides, customizable coupons--just not ebook sales. Although Smashwords provides a fantastic infrastructure to give away free ebooks,  Amazon's sales are significantly better (for me, at least). I like pulling for the underdog, and hate to leave Smashwords, but since Amazon requires exclusivity to get the most out of their services, that's what I plan to do.

Although I haven't set a hard deadline for when I'll pull Crimson & Cream from Smashwords, consider this fair warning. I'll be giving away free copies right up to the end, so if you or someone you know may want to grab the book for free, click here and use this code: RK84U.

Regarding the Amazon ad I ran for my last Kindle Countdown Deal, the results were dismal.  My ad displayed 386 times ('impressions') but had zero customer clicks. The upside is that I didn't get charged anything by Amazon, since there were no clicks; however, that's small consolation.

After I ran my Amazon ad, I found C. L. Murray's blog post where he shares his strategies and results with Amazon ads. I highly recommend reading the post if you're interested in Amazon ads, and also recommend his debut fantasy novel A Facet for the Gem, if your looking for an exciting fantasy read (after you've finished Mirrors & Mist, of course). Based on C. L.'s advice, I'm going to take another shot at Amazon ads following his recommendations.

Regarding my last promotion, I didn't have much luck with my Fussy Librarian ad, either. I sold 3 ebooks the day the ad ran, which is quite a bit lower than sales results I've seen from sites like Ereader News Today (ENT) and BookSends (where I had 15 and 19 sales, respectively). I'll have another Countdown deal coming up in May, and will share my strategy with that promotion when the time comes.

Author Update: I'm crafting/refining the last chapter of Warlock & Wyrm, and am still on schedule for having my changes finished by the end of March (thought it's coming down to the wire). The book now stands over 131,000 words, which is so much more than I ever imagined, but I'm pleased with how the story has developed and feel I've tied up the many loose ends that were dangling.


2017 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2017, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Leaving Smashwords and Other Tidbits
link : Leaving Smashwords and Other Tidbits

Read Also


2017

If you hadn't noticed, I gave my blog a facelift, mainly because Google offered some new free Blogger templates and you know I can't resist free stuff (or leaving well enough alone). If you spot any issues or can't find something that you liked on the old blog page, please let me know, and I will fix it.

All right then, on to the main topic. With the release of the third and final book of my trilogy looming on the horizon, I've decided to retool my marketing strategy. Because the majority of the ebooks I've sold have been through Amazon, I want to try maximizing the options available through KDP Select and plan on enrolling all three books through this exclusive Amazon service (currently only Mirrors & Mist is enrolled). Unfortunately, this means I'll have to pull Crimson & Cream from Smashwords.

I like nearly everything about Smashwords - the publishing help, multiple sales outlets, the 'meatgrinder' book formatter, free self-help guides, customizable coupons--just not ebook sales. Although Smashwords provides a fantastic infrastructure to give away free ebooks,  Amazon's sales are significantly better (for me, at least). I like pulling for the underdog, and hate to leave Smashwords, but since Amazon requires exclusivity to get the most out of their services, that's what I plan to do.

Although I haven't set a hard deadline for when I'll pull Crimson & Cream from Smashwords, consider this fair warning. I'll be giving away free copies right up to the end, so if you or someone you know may want to grab the book for free, click here and use this code: RK84U.

Regarding the Amazon ad I ran for my last Kindle Countdown Deal, the results were dismal.  My ad displayed 386 times ('impressions') but had zero customer clicks. The upside is that I didn't get charged anything by Amazon, since there were no clicks; however, that's small consolation.

After I ran my Amazon ad, I found C. L. Murray's blog post where he shares his strategies and results with Amazon ads. I highly recommend reading the post if you're interested in Amazon ads, and also recommend his debut fantasy novel A Facet for the Gem, if your looking for an exciting fantasy read (after you've finished Mirrors & Mist, of course). Based on C. L.'s advice, I'm going to take another shot at Amazon ads following his recommendations.

Regarding my last promotion, I didn't have much luck with my Fussy Librarian ad, either. I sold 3 ebooks the day the ad ran, which is quite a bit lower than sales results I've seen from sites like Ereader News Today (ENT) and BookSends (where I had 15 and 19 sales, respectively). I'll have another Countdown deal coming up in May, and will share my strategy with that promotion when the time comes.

Author Update: I'm crafting/refining the last chapter of Warlock & Wyrm, and am still on schedule for having my changes finished by the end of March (thought it's coming down to the wire). The book now stands over 131,000 words, which is so much more than I ever imagined, but I'm pleased with how the story has developed and feel I've tied up the many loose ends that were dangling.


Monday, March 6, 2017

Fantasy eBook Deal & Giveaway

My Kindle Countdown Deal for Mirrors & Mist starts today and ends soon. You can purchase Mirrors & Mist for $0.99 on Amazon and get a free copy of Crimson & Cream on Smashwords with this code: WA98P.

My Amazon ad starts tomorrow and runs through Thursday. If you happen to spot the ad, I'd appreciate if you'd let me know, and provide your thoughts/feedback. The details and planning behind this Amazon ad are discussed in this post.

If you want a free copy of Mirrors & Mist, I'll gift the first three responders to this post a free e-book on Amazon. And if you have a spare moment, please help spread the word of this sale. Thanks for your continued support!

Crimson & Cream, Book I of The Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy

Hunted by greedy mercenaries and ferocious monsters, a luckless teenage orphan risks his life to discover and reclaim his stolen birthright.

Mirrors & Mist, Book II of The Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy

Can Jetsam save his beloved mentor from certain death, or will he once again be left homeless and alone with a bounty on his head?

Warlock & Wyrm, Book III of The Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy (coming soon)

With the king and queen poisoned and the princess kidnapped, can the outlaw wizards Jetsam and Seryn save the kingdom that exiled them?

Author Update: The revisions to Warlock & Wyrm are nearing the finish line. To date, I've added five new chapters and over 25,000 words to the draft and am currently working on finishing the last two chapters.

2017 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2017, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Fantasy eBook Deal & Giveaway
link : Fantasy eBook Deal & Giveaway

Read Also


2017

My Kindle Countdown Deal for Mirrors & Mist starts today and ends soon. You can purchase Mirrors & Mist for $0.99 on Amazon and get a free copy of Crimson & Cream on Smashwords with this code: WA98P.

My Amazon ad starts tomorrow and runs through Thursday. If you happen to spot the ad, I'd appreciate if you'd let me know, and provide your thoughts/feedback. The details and planning behind this Amazon ad are discussed in this post.

If you want a free copy of Mirrors & Mist, I'll gift the first three responders to this post a free e-book on Amazon. And if you have a spare moment, please help spread the word of this sale. Thanks for your continued support!

Crimson & Cream, Book I of The Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy

Hunted by greedy mercenaries and ferocious monsters, a luckless teenage orphan risks his life to discover and reclaim his stolen birthright.

Mirrors & Mist, Book II of The Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy

Can Jetsam save his beloved mentor from certain death, or will he once again be left homeless and alone with a bounty on his head?

Warlock & Wyrm, Book III of The Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy (coming soon)

With the king and queen poisoned and the princess kidnapped, can the outlaw wizards Jetsam and Seryn save the kingdom that exiled them?

Author Update: The revisions to Warlock & Wyrm are nearing the finish line. To date, I've added five new chapters and over 25,000 words to the draft and am currently working on finishing the last two chapters.

Thursday, March 2, 2017

A Progress Update

I'm quite horrible at providing updates on my work-in-progress via social media. People don't care whether I've written 1,000 words or revised a chapter or had grilled cheese for brunch. And tweeting about it (or posting a photo of my dairy-centric sandwich on Facebook) feels like a waste of time for all involved. However, a few precious souls are interested in when the third book of the Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy will be released, and to those wonderful folks, I thank you wholeheartedly. This post is for you.

If you follow my little author updates at the bottom of my blog posts, I try to provide brief progress reports. And if you look back at those snippets, you'll find my projections are consistently overly-optimistic. I've always been an impatient person, and have worked on overcoming that (among countless other shortcomings) my whole life, with scant progress. Combine my recalcitrant impatience with the fact that I'm a predominantly lazy person, who enjoys random, unpredictable bursts of frenetic productivity, and you'll see a pattern of inaccurate forecasting emerging.

I've found that painting myself into a corner with deadlines sometimes spurs those elusive productivity bursts. Therefore, I'm setting a target to have the final revision of Warlock & Wyrm, Book III of The Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy, completed and out of my hands by the end of March (2017). I'll send that well-polished version back to my editor, and hopefully, shortly after that, out to my beta readers (if you happen to be interested in beta reading, please let me know--the more the merrier). After my editor's last look, there will be an inevitable round of revisions, but I'm confident the story is in a good place and I can handle the changes in a timely manner.

I want to have Warlock & Wyrm in my beta reader's hands by the end of April. And if I've given you the impression that I've been twiddling my thumbs on this revision (i.e., draft number six), that's not the case. In addition to fixing a plethora of issues my editor pointed out, I've also added over 20,000 words to the novel. It seems my aforementioned impatience/laziness combo conspired to produce a story with a very rushed and threadbare ending. So I'm fixing that, and the book will be much better for it. But it will also take more time. I promise it will be worth the wait.

I'm also running my Amazon ad and a Kindle Countdown Deal next week, March 7 through March 9. You can pick up a copy of Mirrors & Mist for $0.99 and get a free copy of Crimson & Cream on Smashwords with this code: WA98P. And if you've read this far, and are impatient like me, and want a free copy of Mirrors & Mist as well, I'll gift the first five responders a free e-book on Amazon.


2017 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2017, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : A Progress Update
link : A Progress Update

Read Also


2017

I'm quite horrible at providing updates on my work-in-progress via social media. People don't care whether I've written 1,000 words or revised a chapter or had grilled cheese for brunch. And tweeting about it (or posting a photo of my dairy-centric sandwich on Facebook) feels like a waste of time for all involved. However, a few precious souls are interested in when the third book of the Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy will be released, and to those wonderful folks, I thank you wholeheartedly. This post is for you.

If you follow my little author updates at the bottom of my blog posts, I try to provide brief progress reports. And if you look back at those snippets, you'll find my projections are consistently overly-optimistic. I've always been an impatient person, and have worked on overcoming that (among countless other shortcomings) my whole life, with scant progress. Combine my recalcitrant impatience with the fact that I'm a predominantly lazy person, who enjoys random, unpredictable bursts of frenetic productivity, and you'll see a pattern of inaccurate forecasting emerging.

I've found that painting myself into a corner with deadlines sometimes spurs those elusive productivity bursts. Therefore, I'm setting a target to have the final revision of Warlock & Wyrm, Book III of The Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy, completed and out of my hands by the end of March (2017). I'll send that well-polished version back to my editor, and hopefully, shortly after that, out to my beta readers (if you happen to be interested in beta reading, please let me know--the more the merrier). After my editor's last look, there will be an inevitable round of revisions, but I'm confident the story is in a good place and I can handle the changes in a timely manner.

I want to have Warlock & Wyrm in my beta reader's hands by the end of April. And if I've given you the impression that I've been twiddling my thumbs on this revision (i.e., draft number six), that's not the case. In addition to fixing a plethora of issues my editor pointed out, I've also added over 20,000 words to the novel. It seems my aforementioned impatience/laziness combo conspired to produce a story with a very rushed and threadbare ending. So I'm fixing that, and the book will be much better for it. But it will also take more time. I promise it will be worth the wait.

I'm also running my Amazon ad and a Kindle Countdown Deal next week, March 7 through March 9. You can pick up a copy of Mirrors & Mist for $0.99 and get a free copy of Crimson & Cream on Smashwords with this code: WA98P. And if you've read this far, and are impatient like me, and want a free copy of Mirrors & Mist as well, I'll gift the first five responders a free e-book on Amazon.



Thursday, February 2, 2017

Advertising Your eBook on Amazon

How to Run an Ad Campaign for your eBook using Amazon Marketing Services (AMS)


The big question for most authors is "How much will it cost?" With Amazon Marketing Services, you can determine your own budget by setting the maximum amount of US dollars your campaign can be charged in a day, and how many days the campaign will run. Cost-per-click bids start at $0.02 with a daily budget as low as $1. For example, I'm running a 3-day promo from March 7 through March 9, 2017, and I set my daily spend limit at $10 a day, which means my total cost is capped at $30.

So how does that $30 get spent? You pay a set amount when a customer clicks your ad (I set my Cost-per-Click at $0.25). Readers who click your ad will be sent to your book's detail page. You're charged for each click, regardless of whether or not the clicker buys your book once they're at your book page.

So, assuming this fits within your budget, how do you get started? First, the obvious: you need an Amazon account and your eBook must be published with Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP). Your eBook has to be written in English, available on Amazon.com, and must follow the Kindle Authors and Book Publishers Creative Acceptance Policies.

If you meet those prerequisites, you're ready to go. Just follow these steps:
  1. Log into your Amazon KDP Author Dashboard. On your Bookshelf page, find the book you want to advertise, and click on the "Promote and Advertise" button. On the next page, click on the "Create an ad campaign" button. From there, you are taken to the Amazon Marketing Services website for Step 2:
  2. Two different campaign types are presented on this page: Sponsored Products and Product Display Ads. You can select one of the two options. So what are the differences? According to Amazon, Sponsored Product ads "are keyword-targeted ads that appear below search results and on detail pages," while Product Display Ads are "reader and genre-targeted ads on detail pages." If you're like me, after reading those descriptions, you went "Huh?" The main differences are that Sponsored Product ads target shoppers when they are viewing specific products similar to your eBook, while Product Display Ads use customer interest targeting or product targeting to place your eBook ads. Still confused? Check out the Amazon Getting Started Guide and look at the 1st and 3rd columns to compare options. Of course, Amazon suggests running both types of ads for your book to maximize your eBook's exposure, and if you'd like to do this, return to Step 2 after completing your first campaign (whichever option you choose).
  3. Select your customer targeting, which varies depending on which ad product you selected in Step 2 above. 
    1. For Sponsored Products, you can choose between Automatic Targeting, where Amazon targets your ad to relevant customer searches based on your eBook information, or Manual Targeting where you add the keywords or phrases to your ad. For my first run, I opted to use Amazon's auto-targeting algorithm, as opposed to relying on my own marketing genius.
    2. For Product Display Ads: You can target your ad by either related products (books or otherwise) or by customer interest (genre). Campaigns targeted by customer interest may also qualify for ad placement on Kindle E-readers.
  4. Set your campaign budget and Cost-Per-Click amounts.
  5. Set the start and end dates of your ad campaign, and you're done.
For me, the biggest decision was whether to choose Sponsored Product or Product Display ads. Since the Sponsored Product ads let you set a campaign budget as low as $1 per day, I chose this option for my first try. If you're undecided, try experimenting with both options on the AMS website. You can page back to select one or the other after you've examined both variations. There are subtle differences in marketing strategies between the two, and I intend to experiment with both and compare results.

A second tough decision is how to set your cost-per-click amount. I rather arbitrarily chose $0.25 per click, which means 40 clicks will use up my daily budget, and cost me $10 (assuming I get 40 clicks, which is not guaranteed). To break even on this promo, I'll need to have 8 of the 40 people clicking on my ad actually buy the book.

Amazon states that ads compete based on the cost-per-click bid amounts provided by advertisers. Your actual cost-per-click is determined in an auction with other eligible ads. You'll be charged $0.01 per click more than the second-highest bid in the auction, up to your maximum bid. So if you set a cost-per-click bid that's too low, your ad may not be shown.

I'll post a promo autopsy here in March after my campaign finishes and let you know how it performed. I suspect there will be several valuable lessons learned. Do you have any experience with Amazon ads? I'd love to hear any tips or suggestions you may have.

Author Update: I have all of my editor's significant and lengthy comments back on Warlock & Wyrm, and am currently about 60% of the way through addressing them. My goal is to finish by the end of February and then give it another read and polish before sending it back to my editor for her final review.


2017 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2017, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Advertising Your eBook on Amazon
link : Advertising Your eBook on Amazon

Read Also


2017

How to Run an Ad Campaign for your eBook using Amazon Marketing Services (AMS)


The big question for most authors is "How much will it cost?" With Amazon Marketing Services, you can determine your own budget by setting the maximum amount of US dollars your campaign can be charged in a day, and how many days the campaign will run. Cost-per-click bids start at $0.02 with a daily budget as low as $1. For example, I'm running a 3-day promo from March 7 through March 9, 2017, and I set my daily spend limit at $10 a day, which means my total cost is capped at $30.

So how does that $30 get spent? You pay a set amount when a customer clicks your ad (I set my Cost-per-Click at $0.25). Readers who click your ad will be sent to your book's detail page. You're charged for each click, regardless of whether or not the clicker buys your book once they're at your book page.

So, assuming this fits within your budget, how do you get started? First, the obvious: you need an Amazon account and your eBook must be published with Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP). Your eBook has to be written in English, available on Amazon.com, and must follow the Kindle Authors and Book Publishers Creative Acceptance Policies.

If you meet those prerequisites, you're ready to go. Just follow these steps:
  1. Log into your Amazon KDP Author Dashboard. On your Bookshelf page, find the book you want to advertise, and click on the "Promote and Advertise" button. On the next page, click on the "Create an ad campaign" button. From there, you are taken to the Amazon Marketing Services website for Step 2:
  2. Two different campaign types are presented on this page: Sponsored Products and Product Display Ads. You can select one of the two options. So what are the differences? According to Amazon, Sponsored Product ads "are keyword-targeted ads that appear below search results and on detail pages," while Product Display Ads are "reader and genre-targeted ads on detail pages." If you're like me, after reading those descriptions, you went "Huh?" The main differences are that Sponsored Product ads target shoppers when they are viewing specific products similar to your eBook, while Product Display Ads use customer interest targeting or product targeting to place your eBook ads. Still confused? Check out the Amazon Getting Started Guide and look at the 1st and 3rd columns to compare options. Of course, Amazon suggests running both types of ads for your book to maximize your eBook's exposure, and if you'd like to do this, return to Step 2 after completing your first campaign (whichever option you choose).
  3. Select your customer targeting, which varies depending on which ad product you selected in Step 2 above. 
    1. For Sponsored Products, you can choose between Automatic Targeting, where Amazon targets your ad to relevant customer searches based on your eBook information, or Manual Targeting where you add the keywords or phrases to your ad. For my first run, I opted to use Amazon's auto-targeting algorithm, as opposed to relying on my own marketing genius.
    2. For Product Display Ads: You can target your ad by either related products (books or otherwise) or by customer interest (genre). Campaigns targeted by customer interest may also qualify for ad placement on Kindle E-readers.
  4. Set your campaign budget and Cost-Per-Click amounts.
  5. Set the start and end dates of your ad campaign, and you're done.
For me, the biggest decision was whether to choose Sponsored Product or Product Display ads. Since the Sponsored Product ads let you set a campaign budget as low as $1 per day, I chose this option for my first try. If you're undecided, try experimenting with both options on the AMS website. You can page back to select one or the other after you've examined both variations. There are subtle differences in marketing strategies between the two, and I intend to experiment with both and compare results.

A second tough decision is how to set your cost-per-click amount. I rather arbitrarily chose $0.25 per click, which means 40 clicks will use up my daily budget, and cost me $10 (assuming I get 40 clicks, which is not guaranteed). To break even on this promo, I'll need to have 8 of the 40 people clicking on my ad actually buy the book.

Amazon states that ads compete based on the cost-per-click bid amounts provided by advertisers. Your actual cost-per-click is determined in an auction with other eligible ads. You'll be charged $0.01 per click more than the second-highest bid in the auction, up to your maximum bid. So if you set a cost-per-click bid that's too low, your ad may not be shown.

I'll post a promo autopsy here in March after my campaign finishes and let you know how it performed. I suspect there will be several valuable lessons learned. Do you have any experience with Amazon ads? I'd love to hear any tips or suggestions you may have.

Author Update: I have all of my editor's significant and lengthy comments back on Warlock & Wyrm, and am currently about 60% of the way through addressing them. My goal is to finish by the end of February and then give it another read and polish before sending it back to my editor for her final review.


Thursday, January 5, 2017

The Best of My 2016 Reading List

Happy 2017! I hope you enjoyed the holiday season and I wish you all the very best for the new year.

My 2016 Goodreads Summary reports that in 2016, I read 40 books, not including 5 drafts of my own novel, Warlock & Wyrm.  I didn't quite finish Brandon Sanderson's The Way of Kings before the end of 2016, though I'm over 900 pages deep. It will be my first finished read of 2017. If you're curious as to what my reading tastes are, here is a summary of the best of what I read last year.

My personal top five (in no particular order) 5-Star-rated speculative fiction:
My personal independent speculative fiction favorites (again--no particular order):
And a few awesome non-fiction indie works:
Author Update: After a bit of a holiday break, I'm continuing to work with my editor on Warlock & Wyrm. I'm projecting to have my editor finish her review and comments in February, and then I'll incorporate my revisions and do another scrub before sending the story to my beta readers. I'm targeting a mid-2017 release. 

2017 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2017, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : The Best of My 2016 Reading List
link : The Best of My 2016 Reading List

Read Also


2017

Happy 2017! I hope you enjoyed the holiday season and I wish you all the very best for the new year.

My 2016 Goodreads Summary reports that in 2016, I read 40 books, not including 5 drafts of my own novel, Warlock & Wyrm.  I didn't quite finish Brandon Sanderson's The Way of Kings before the end of 2016, though I'm over 900 pages deep. It will be my first finished read of 2017. If you're curious as to what my reading tastes are, here is a summary of the best of what I read last year.

My personal top five (in no particular order) 5-Star-rated speculative fiction:

My personal independent speculative fiction favorites (again--no particular order):
And a few awesome non-fiction indie works:
Author Update: After a bit of a holiday break, I'm continuing to work with my editor on Warlock & Wyrm. I'm projecting to have my editor finish her review and comments in February, and then I'll incorporate my revisions and do another scrub before sending the story to my beta readers. I'm targeting a mid-2017 release.