Thursday, March 24, 2016

Pro Writing Aid Update

I've posted about Pro Writing Aid (PWA) previously, and compared the online editing tool to other similar products. As you may recall, I found their free editing tools an excellent resource, comparable to some for-pay services. I ultimately purchased their 1-year premium package, and was pleased with the additions offered in the for-pay product. Since then, my PWA premium subscription ($35 a year) expired, and in November, 2015, during a Cyber Monday 48-hour special, I signed up for PWA's lifetime membership ($50 at the time, regularly $120).

In January, PWA invited me to join their affiliate program, and I did, so to be transparent, if you buy their product through this website, I'll receive a commission on the sale. That being said, I used PWA for years prior to joining their affiliate program and find their editing tool outstanding.

In fact, while PWA's premium additions save time and increase the tool's efficiency and flexibility, the core editing functions are all available in the free version. If you're considering using PWA, I would suggest testing the free version before jumping to premium. Once you're familiar with the free online tool, judging whether the perks are worth the cost should be clear.

PWA offers a free, 75-page user guide available in pdf form. This instruction manual is a great tool for beginners and an excellent resource for learning everything PWA offers. I recommend browsing the manual first if you have any interest in the editing program, to get an idea of the tool's capabilities.

Until May 1, 2016, you can win a lifetime PWA membership in the $5,000 Publishing Package giveaway at Standoutbooks. I've entered the contest, and if you're interested in finding out more about the prizes and rules, click here. There--I've officially decreased my chances of winning.

Also, for a limited time, PWA is offering a free 25-page ebook--20 Editing Tips from Professional Writers. Many of these tips can also be found on the PWA blog, however, the ebook combines them nicely in one handy file.

Speaking of their blog, PWA posts articles on grammar and writing-related topics several times a week. It's a valuable source of free writing tips, and contains over four years of content for your perusal.

If you're interested in my opinions on self-editing tools, links to my other related posts are provided below:
Author Update: I'm currently editing Warlock & Wyrm, Book III of The Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy, and am near the halfway point. My target is to provide a thoroughly self-edited manuscript to my editor in June.


March 2016 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title March 2016, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Pro Writing Aid Update
link : Pro Writing Aid Update

Read Also


March 2016

I've posted about Pro Writing Aid (PWA) previously, and compared the online editing tool to other similar products. As you may recall, I found their free editing tools an excellent resource, comparable to some for-pay services. I ultimately purchased their 1-year premium package, and was pleased with the additions offered in the for-pay product. Since then, my PWA premium subscription ($35 a year) expired, and in November, 2015, during a Cyber Monday 48-hour special, I signed up for PWA's lifetime membership ($50 at the time, regularly $120).

In January, PWA invited me to join their affiliate program, and I did, so to be transparent, if you buy their product through this website, I'll receive a commission on the sale. That being said, I used PWA for years prior to joining their affiliate program and find their editing tool outstanding.

In fact, while PWA's premium additions save time and increase the tool's efficiency and flexibility, the core editing functions are all available in the free version. If you're considering using PWA, I would suggest testing the free version before jumping to premium. Once you're familiar with the free online tool, judging whether the perks are worth the cost should be clear.

PWA offers a free, 75-page user guide available in pdf form. This instruction manual is a great tool for beginners and an excellent resource for learning everything PWA offers. I recommend browsing the manual first if you have any interest in the editing program, to get an idea of the tool's capabilities.

Until May 1, 2016, you can win a lifetime PWA membership in the $5,000 Publishing Package giveaway at Standoutbooks. I've entered the contest, and if you're interested in finding out more about the prizes and rules, click here. There--I've officially decreased my chances of winning.

Also, for a limited time, PWA is offering a free 25-page ebook--20 Editing Tips from Professional Writers. Many of these tips can also be found on the PWA blog, however, the ebook combines them nicely in one handy file.

Speaking of their blog, PWA posts articles on grammar and writing-related topics several times a week. It's a valuable source of free writing tips, and contains over four years of content for your perusal.

If you're interested in my opinions on self-editing tools, links to my other related posts are provided below:

Author Update: I'm currently editing Warlock & Wyrm, Book III of The Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy, and am near the halfway point. My target is to provide a thoroughly self-edited manuscript to my editor in June.


Thursday, March 10, 2016

LibraryThing Giveaway Results

What is LibraryThing? In its simplest terms, LibraryThing is a website for creating your own professional-quality online book catalog. However, LibraryThing also connects people with similar reading tastes, recommends books to read based on your catalog and ratings, showcases local events, hosts groups and discussion boards, features book giveaways, and much more. Goodreads (and the former Shelfari) is probably the most recognizable service similar to LibraryThing, although they are not carbon copies of each other.

I'm going to focus on one specific function on LibraryThing; the LibraryThing Member Giveaway. These giveaways allow members (authors, publishers, and agents) to list books (paper, ebook, or audio book) for free giveaways. The giver pays shipping or provides ebooks via downloads or e-mail. The giveaway winners are randomly chosen by LibraryThing, and the book giver is provided information on how to contact the winners with their free books. A feature of the giveaway allows you to ask for reviews in exchange for the free book, and although there are no guarantees reviews will be posted, it's still a helpful reminder to the readers.

How is LibraryThing different from Amazon KDP Select giveaway or a Goodreads giveaway? LibraryThing allows you to give away ebooks and audio books, while Goodreads restricts its giveaways to print books only. Amazon KDP Select free days do allow you to include ebooks and audio books as well as print versions, however, LibraryThing's giveaway differs from Amazon in several ways. For one, in a LibraryThing giveaway, the author is responsible for distributing the books. While this method is inherently more work, you do receive the advantage of learning more about your readers than via Amazon's anonymous distribution, because you are the one who is mailing (or e-mailing) your book directly to the reader. This allows you to build your mailing list and keep track of your readers. Due to Amazon distributing your books directly to the customer, reader retention is not something you can achieve with a KDP Select giveaway.

I ran a one-month giveaway for Crimson & Cream during February, 2016. I offered 100 free e-books via Smashwords coupon downloads. Of the 100 copies available, LibraryThing members requested 59 ebooks.

Of the 59 winners, 35 claimed their books. This amount of downloads placed Mirrors & Mist in the #1 spot on the  Smashwords Fantasy category (ebooks with 50K+ words sorted by units sold).
As of today, I've received three reviews on LibraryThing and one new rating on Goodreads (which may be unrelated to the giveaway).

Of the 35 people who requested books, the majority were American (from 22 different U.S. states), although readers from Australia, Canada, Finland, Norway, Scotland, Singapore, South Africa and the UK requested books as well.

Overall, I am pleased with the results of the LibraryThing giveaway. To me, the return on investment was positive. The LibraryThing Member Giveaway process was easy to understand and implement, and not time-consuming, and I plan on doing it again.

Author Update: I'm currently editing Warlock & Wyrm, Book III of The Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy, and would estimate my progress as about 20% completed. I also updated the cover of Mirrors & Mist (which you can see at the top right of this web page).


March 2016 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title March 2016, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : LibraryThing Giveaway Results
link : LibraryThing Giveaway Results

Read Also


March 2016

What is LibraryThing? In its simplest terms, LibraryThing is a website for creating your own professional-quality online book catalog. However, LibraryThing also connects people with similar reading tastes, recommends books to read based on your catalog and ratings, showcases local events, hosts groups and discussion boards, features book giveaways, and much more. Goodreads (and the former Shelfari) is probably the most recognizable service similar to LibraryThing, although they are not carbon copies of each other.

I'm going to focus on one specific function on LibraryThing; the LibraryThing Member Giveaway. These giveaways allow members (authors, publishers, and agents) to list books (paper, ebook, or audio book) for free giveaways. The giver pays shipping or provides ebooks via downloads or e-mail. The giveaway winners are randomly chosen by LibraryThing, and the book giver is provided information on how to contact the winners with their free books. A feature of the giveaway allows you to ask for reviews in exchange for the free book, and although there are no guarantees reviews will be posted, it's still a helpful reminder to the readers.

How is LibraryThing different from Amazon KDP Select giveaway or a Goodreads giveaway? LibraryThing allows you to give away ebooks and audio books, while Goodreads restricts its giveaways to print books only. Amazon KDP Select free days do allow you to include ebooks and audio books as well as print versions, however, LibraryThing's giveaway differs from Amazon in several ways. For one, in a LibraryThing giveaway, the author is responsible for distributing the books. While this method is inherently more work, you do receive the advantage of learning more about your readers than via Amazon's anonymous distribution, because you are the one who is mailing (or e-mailing) your book directly to the reader. This allows you to build your mailing list and keep track of your readers. Due to Amazon distributing your books directly to the customer, reader retention is not something you can achieve with a KDP Select giveaway.

I ran a one-month giveaway for Crimson & Cream during February, 2016. I offered 100 free e-books via Smashwords coupon downloads. Of the 100 copies available, LibraryThing members requested 59 ebooks.

Of the 59 winners, 35 claimed their books. This amount of downloads placed Mirrors & Mist in the #1 spot on the  Smashwords Fantasy category (ebooks with 50K+ words sorted by units sold).

As of today, I've received three reviews on LibraryThing and one new rating on Goodreads (which may be unrelated to the giveaway).

Of the 35 people who requested books, the majority were American (from 22 different U.S. states), although readers from Australia, Canada, Finland, Norway, Scotland, Singapore, South Africa and the UK requested books as well.

Overall, I am pleased with the results of the LibraryThing giveaway. To me, the return on investment was positive. The LibraryThing Member Giveaway process was easy to understand and implement, and not time-consuming, and I plan on doing it again.

Author Update: I'm currently editing Warlock & Wyrm, Book III of The Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy, and would estimate my progress as about 20% completed. I also updated the cover of Mirrors & Mist (which you can see at the top right of this web page).