Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Beginner's Chronicle of Self-Publishing #5: Requesting Reviews

Here's a little statistical research-in-progress, just to give you an idea of what to expect, should you do the same.  I've e-mailed approximately 25 requests to online book reviewers to see if they would be interested in reading and reviewing Crimson & Cream.  So far, I've had 2-3 people e-mail back politely declining for various reasons.  I've also heard back from 7 people indicating they were adding my ebook to their list.  So far, no reviews, but it's been less than two weeks since I started soliciting for them.  Many reviewers estimate a backlog of a month or more before they can get to your book.  Patience is key.

Regarding online reviewers, other than Googling, these are a few reviewer lists I found.  Some of their links are dead, and some are no longer accepting reviews, but it's a good place to start.
August 2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title August 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Beginner's Chronicle of Self-Publishing #5: Requesting Reviews
link : Beginner's Chronicle of Self-Publishing #5: Requesting Reviews

Read Also


August 2012

Here's a little statistical research-in-progress, just to give you an idea of what to expect, should you do the same.  I've e-mailed approximately 25 requests to online book reviewers to see if they would be interested in reading and reviewing Crimson & Cream.  So far, I've had 2-3 people e-mail back politely declining for various reasons.  I've also heard back from 7 people indicating they were adding my ebook to their list.  So far, no reviews, but it's been less than two weeks since I started soliciting for them.  Many reviewers estimate a backlog of a month or more before they can get to your book.  Patience is key.

Regarding online reviewers, other than Googling, these are a few reviewer lists I found.  Some of their links are dead, and some are no longer accepting reviews, but it's a good place to start.

Friday, August 10, 2012

Online Editing Software (Chronicle #2)

I mentioned in a prior post that I used the AutoCrit Editing Wizard for my novel Crimson & Cream.  Before I purchased the service, I did some research on online editing tools.  They seem to be very polarizing to people, with a lot of haters.  Personally, I thought it was a helpful tool and I feel like I got my worth $77 for a year's subscription.  I'm not going to walk you through the mechanics of the service (that's all available on their website), however, I will mention some of the features I found useful:

  • Sentence Length Variation shows you the number of words in each of your sentences, and makes it easy to identify run-on sentences.
  • Repeated Words and Phrases does what it says and highlights text that is used multiple times in your document.
  • Dialogue identifies your "he said," "she said" tags, and lets you easily compare these.
It also spits out a ton of word data on your document, such as word count, average sentence length, reading level, and many others. 

One of the features I found limiting was the word count limit.  The "Platinum" package I ordered allowed the analysis of up to 8,000 words at a time.  This meant I had to analyze 2-3 chapters at a time, instead of my entire novel at once.  In retrospect, this may be somewhat of a blessing in disguise, as it forces you to look at your writing in smaller chunks.  I ended up analyzing chapter-by-chapter, which meant I cut, pasted, and analyzed 28 separate blocks of text.

In general, I think it's a great tool to ensure you have word variety in your text by pointing out your tendencies, such as overuse of certain words and phrases.  I don't want to imply that it takes the place of a good human copy reader or editor, though.

August 2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title August 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Online Editing Software (Chronicle #2)
link : Online Editing Software (Chronicle #2)

Read Also


August 2012

I mentioned in a prior post that I used the AutoCrit Editing Wizard for my novel Crimson & Cream.  Before I purchased the service, I did some research on online editing tools.  They seem to be very polarizing to people, with a lot of haters.  Personally, I thought it was a helpful tool and I feel like I got my worth $77 for a year's subscription.  I'm not going to walk you through the mechanics of the service (that's all available on their website), however, I will mention some of the features I found useful:

  • Sentence Length Variation shows you the number of words in each of your sentences, and makes it easy to identify run-on sentences.
  • Repeated Words and Phrases does what it says and highlights text that is used multiple times in your document.
  • Dialogue identifies your "he said," "she said" tags, and lets you easily compare these.
It also spits out a ton of word data on your document, such as word count, average sentence length, reading level, and many others. 

One of the features I found limiting was the word count limit.  The "Platinum" package I ordered allowed the analysis of up to 8,000 words at a time.  This meant I had to analyze 2-3 chapters at a time, instead of my entire novel at once.  In retrospect, this may be somewhat of a blessing in disguise, as it forces you to look at your writing in smaller chunks.  I ended up analyzing chapter-by-chapter, which meant I cut, pasted, and analyzed 28 separate blocks of text.

In general, I think it's a great tool to ensure you have word variety in your text by pointing out your tendencies, such as overuse of certain words and phrases.  I don't want to imply that it takes the place of a good human copy reader or editor, though.

Thursday, August 9, 2012

A Beginner's Chronicle of Self-Publishing

I thought I'd document my progress in online self-publishing and (hopefully) selling my first ebook.  Maybe other authors would find a chronology of the process helpful, or maybe point out some of the opportunities I might be missing.  Anyway, here goes.

I finished writing a fantasy novel in 2001 that I was unable to get published after about 3 years of trying.  I liked the story and thought "Why not self-publish?"  The book was just sitting on my hard drive anyway.  Once online publishing got my attention in 2011, I decided that was the route for me.

Even though I was on my 10th draft when I decided to self-publish, I hadn't read my book in over six years, so fresh eyes instigated completion of my 11th and 12th drafts.  I wanted to have my book professionally copy read/edited, but after searching online and seeing the costs involved, I decided to self-edit the book using the AutoCrit Editing Wizard.  At $77 a year, it was much cheaper than hiring a live person.  I hope AutoCrit helped me polish my book enough to make it worthwhile.  I think it did, but time will tell.  Although I think  AutoCrit is a useful tool, it's not a magic bullet.  You still do the work in evaluating which of its recommendations to implement.

Next post, I'll give you some insight on my experience with AutoCrit.
August 2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title August 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : A Beginner's Chronicle of Self-Publishing
link : A Beginner's Chronicle of Self-Publishing

Read Also


August 2012

I thought I'd document my progress in online self-publishing and (hopefully) selling my first ebook.  Maybe other authors would find a chronology of the process helpful, or maybe point out some of the opportunities I might be missing.  Anyway, here goes.

I finished writing a fantasy novel in 2001 that I was unable to get published after about 3 years of trying.  I liked the story and thought "Why not self-publish?"  The book was just sitting on my hard drive anyway.  Once online publishing got my attention in 2011, I decided that was the route for me.

Even though I was on my 10th draft when I decided to self-publish, I hadn't read my book in over six years, so fresh eyes instigated completion of my 11th and 12th drafts.  I wanted to have my book professionally copy read/edited, but after searching online and seeing the costs involved, I decided to self-edit the book using the AutoCrit Editing Wizard.  At $77 a year, it was much cheaper than hiring a live person.  I hope AutoCrit helped me polish my book enough to make it worthwhile.  I think it did, but time will tell.  Although I think  AutoCrit is a useful tool, it's not a magic bullet.  You still do the work in evaluating which of its recommendations to implement.

Next post, I'll give you some insight on my experience with AutoCrit.