Sunday, December 30, 2012

What's Your Page Look Like on Every Device?

Over the holidays, I saw my website on an iPad.

It was a mess.

Text overlapped images and everything squished together, even when holding the tablet in 'landscape' orientation.  So I decided I needed to fix my web page (because I heard these iPad things are getting popular).

But how?  Therein lies the rub.  I did some Googling and found several websites that simulate (for free) what your (or any) web page will look like on a variety of computers, tablets, and smart phones.  I particularly liked this one:  http://quirktools.com/screenfly/

Using Screenfly, you can preview your web page on different computer monitor sizes, net books, the iPad, Galaxy, Zoom and other tablets, 8 different smart phones, and 3 TV resolutions.  It even lets you rotate the page and simulate scrolling.

You won't easily get your page to look perfect on all of them, but you can get a good idea which platforms really massacre the look of your page.  Needless to say, I did some reorganizing and re-sizing of my webpage and this very blog.  If you're reading this on a mobile device right now, let me know what you think (post a comment below or drop me an e-mail).

Just to be clear, this is not a shameless plug for Screenfly.  It's just a cool website I stumbled across and found useful and easy to use.  I'd never heard of it before yesterday.

I added some more photos to my Pinterest collection.  If you happen to have read Crimson & Cream, check out my Pinterest boards and see if your imagination matches mine.


2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : What's Your Page Look Like on Every Device?
link : What's Your Page Look Like on Every Device?

Read Also


2012

Over the holidays, I saw my website on an iPad.

It was a mess.

Text overlapped images and everything squished together, even when holding the tablet in 'landscape' orientation.  So I decided I needed to fix my web page (because I heard these iPad things are getting popular).

But how?  Therein lies the rub.  I did some Googling and found several websites that simulate (for free) what your (or any) web page will look like on a variety of computers, tablets, and smart phones.  I particularly liked this one:  http://quirktools.com/screenfly/

Using Screenfly, you can preview your web page on different computer monitor sizes, net books, the iPad, Galaxy, Zoom and other tablets, 8 different smart phones, and 3 TV resolutions.  It even lets you rotate the page and simulate scrolling.

You won't easily get your page to look perfect on all of them, but you can get a good idea which platforms really massacre the look of your page.  Needless to say, I did some reorganizing and re-sizing of my webpage and this very blog.  If you're reading this on a mobile device right now, let me know what you think (post a comment below or drop me an e-mail).

Just to be clear, this is not a shameless plug for Screenfly.  It's just a cool website I stumbled across and found useful and easy to use.  I'd never heard of it before yesterday.

I added some more photos to my Pinterest collection.  If you happen to have read Crimson & Cream, check out my Pinterest boards and see if your imagination matches mine.


Thursday, December 20, 2012

Holiday Potluck

Wow, that was a fast week!  What I've got today is a potpourri of random stuff to close out my 2012 blogging (even if the world doesn't end tonight, I've got holiday travel and a busy schedule the rest of the year, so this is my last planned blog for the year).
  • FREE Crimson & Cream at Novelnook through the end of 2012 (whenever that may be!).  Use the coupon code to get a free download.  Speaking of Novelnook, they launched full-scale out of their beta this week.  Check it out here for more details:  Novelnook - Launched.  One new thing I noticed they added was an explanation of their rating scale.  Crimson & Cream has been rated 5.5 for a while, and I wasn't too excited about a 5.5, since I assumed it was a 10 scale. However, it is a 5 scale.  So how do I have 5.5 rating?  Extra credit?  No, actually, Novelnook itself reserves the right to give select books a rating of 6, which apparently, Crimson & Cream received (Thanks Novelnook!).
  • Google+ Communities:  I discovered some very large writing communities on the new Google+ feature 'Communities.'  I've interacted a bit with several of these writing communities this week and have found some nice, helpful people and a lot of good information.  I've also experimented in some 'circle sharing,' and found out it's an easy way to blow up your circles (if you're into that sort of thing). With not much effort this week, I added over 1,200 people to my circles, over 500 of which have added me to theirs.  Also, I have a Google+ page for Crimson & Cream (in addition to my own page), however, I'm not sure I'm getting much mileage out of this feature.  If you have any experience using Google+ pages to promote your stuff, I'd love to hear about it (hint, hint).
  • Volume II of the Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy:  On my last post, I talked about my trying to spend more time writing and a little less on social media marketing.  I decided my goal was to write at least one sentence every day, with the idea being writing one sentence is easy, and hopefully, after meeting this modest goal, I'd keep writing and complete more than one sentence a day.  I've kept it up for over a week, and it seems to be helping.  There's been a day or two where I had to stop at one sentence (busy, tired, etc.), but most days I've done much more than that.  This week I've gone from 27,000 to 31,205 words.
And finally, in the rich, months-long tradition of my blog, a little something from my Pinterest page (Happy Holidays everyone!  Now I gotta go write that sentence ;-):

2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Holiday Potluck
link : Holiday Potluck

Read Also


2012

Wow, that was a fast week!  What I've got today is a potpourri of random stuff to close out my 2012 blogging (even if the world doesn't end tonight, I've got holiday travel and a busy schedule the rest of the year, so this is my last planned blog for the year).

  • FREE Crimson & Cream at Novelnook through the end of 2012 (whenever that may be!).  Use the coupon code to get a free download.  Speaking of Novelnook, they launched full-scale out of their beta this week.  Check it out here for more details:  Novelnook - Launched.  One new thing I noticed they added was an explanation of their rating scale.  Crimson & Cream has been rated 5.5 for a while, and I wasn't too excited about a 5.5, since I assumed it was a 10 scale. However, it is a 5 scale.  So how do I have 5.5 rating?  Extra credit?  No, actually, Novelnook itself reserves the right to give select books a rating of 6, which apparently, Crimson & Cream received (Thanks Novelnook!).
  • Google+ Communities:  I discovered some very large writing communities on the new Google+ feature 'Communities.'  I've interacted a bit with several of these writing communities this week and have found some nice, helpful people and a lot of good information.  I've also experimented in some 'circle sharing,' and found out it's an easy way to blow up your circles (if you're into that sort of thing). With not much effort this week, I added over 1,200 people to my circles, over 500 of which have added me to theirs.  Also, I have a Google+ page for Crimson & Cream (in addition to my own page), however, I'm not sure I'm getting much mileage out of this feature.  If you have any experience using Google+ pages to promote your stuff, I'd love to hear about it (hint, hint).
  • Volume II of the Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy:  On my last post, I talked about my trying to spend more time writing and a little less on social media marketing.  I decided my goal was to write at least one sentence every day, with the idea being writing one sentence is easy, and hopefully, after meeting this modest goal, I'd keep writing and complete more than one sentence a day.  I've kept it up for over a week, and it seems to be helping.  There's been a day or two where I had to stop at one sentence (busy, tired, etc.), but most days I've done much more than that.  This week I've gone from 27,000 to 31,205 words.
And finally, in the rich, months-long tradition of my blog, a little something from my Pinterest page (Happy Holidays everyone!  Now I gotta go write that sentence ;-):

Friday, December 14, 2012

Write, Write, Write. Right!

One of the many blogs I follow is Lindsay Buroker's, which in itself is an excellent read, but today had a guest post by Collin J. Earl, who wrote, among other interesting things, the following lines that struck a chord with me:
"You need to write. That is the key, writing, writing, writing. Content, content, content. You’ve got to do it. I cannot say it enough. That is the one thing that has not changed in the last five years. You want to be a paid author, (I don’t say successful because there are different definitions) I mean a paid author – one who makes money off of books, you need as much content as possible."
I've found myself spending more time on my facebook author page, blogging, Google+, Goodreads, Shelfari, et al, as opposed to focusing on writing the second book of The Oxbow Kindgom Trilogy.  Not to say that I'm not writing--I am.  Book II is open on my desktop right now, and is around 27,000 words in a first draft, which is not bad, considering I starting writing book two in earnest about two months ago.  Obviously, I'm not on a NaNoWriMo pace, but still, it's coming along.  However, my goal is to pick up the pace at the cost of some of my self-marketing efforts.  Collin's article made a lot of sense to me. As obvious as it is, finishing the entire trilogy will do more for selling my books than all the social media marketing I could do.  After all, intuitively, as a reader, I would be much more likely to start reading a trilogy once I knew it was actually completed.

So that's my plan;  scale back a touch on the social media promoting and spend more time getting words on the page.  After blogging for almost five months now, I think a post a week is an output I can maintain, and if you're reading this now, you can expect new content here at least once a week, for now, and into the near future.

Switching topics with this not-so-subtle segue, another blog I read is We Blog Better, which had another good article on the obvious.  I've given you the link (above) if you care to check it out, but the gist of the latest post was that if you want your readers to interact with your blog, SAY IT!  So here goes, PLEASE POST HERE!  Drop me a comment on the bottom of this post and I guarantee I will respond.  Have a question?  Let me know.  Suggestions?  Love to hear 'em.  Complaints?  I feel your pain.

In striving for consistency, I'll leave you with another sample of my Pinterest page.  Take care!

2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Write, Write, Write. Right!
link : Write, Write, Write. Right!

Read Also


2012

One of the many blogs I follow is Lindsay Buroker's, which in itself is an excellent read, but today had a guest post by Collin J. Earl, who wrote, among other interesting things, the following lines that struck a chord with me:

"You need to write. That is the key, writing, writing, writing. Content, content, content. You’ve got to do it. I cannot say it enough. That is the one thing that has not changed in the last five years. You want to be a paid author, (I don’t say successful because there are different definitions) I mean a paid author – one who makes money off of books, you need as much content as possible."
I've found myself spending more time on my facebook author page, blogging, Google+, Goodreads, Shelfari, et al, as opposed to focusing on writing the second book of The Oxbow Kindgom Trilogy.  Not to say that I'm not writing--I am.  Book II is open on my desktop right now, and is around 27,000 words in a first draft, which is not bad, considering I starting writing book two in earnest about two months ago.  Obviously, I'm not on a NaNoWriMo pace, but still, it's coming along.  However, my goal is to pick up the pace at the cost of some of my self-marketing efforts.  Collin's article made a lot of sense to me. As obvious as it is, finishing the entire trilogy will do more for selling my books than all the social media marketing I could do.  After all, intuitively, as a reader, I would be much more likely to start reading a trilogy once I knew it was actually completed.

So that's my plan;  scale back a touch on the social media promoting and spend more time getting words on the page.  After blogging for almost five months now, I think a post a week is an output I can maintain, and if you're reading this now, you can expect new content here at least once a week, for now, and into the near future.

Switching topics with this not-so-subtle segue, another blog I read is We Blog Better, which had another good article on the obvious.  I've given you the link (above) if you care to check it out, but the gist of the latest post was that if you want your readers to interact with your blog, SAY IT!  So here goes, PLEASE POST HERE!  Drop me a comment on the bottom of this post and I guarantee I will respond.  Have a question?  Let me know.  Suggestions?  Love to hear 'em.  Complaints?  I feel your pain.

In striving for consistency, I'll leave you with another sample of my Pinterest page.  Take care!

Saturday, December 1, 2012

The Jealousy Glass (Artifacts of Empire)

Today I'm participating in a blog blitz for Gwen Perkins's new novel The Jealousy Glass (Artifacts of Empire).  There are all sorts of goodies below, so please check them out!

"We came to stop a war before it came to Cercia.  And it seems the war has come to us."

Responsibility and patriotism spur Cercia's new leader, Quentin, to protect his beloved country at all costs and he assigns Asahel and Felix to serve as ambassadors and secret agents to Anjdur. Their journey quickly turns awry and Asahel and Felix barely escape a devastating shipwreck, walk a tightrope of political tension, and rescue an empress before they learn they must face an enemy closer to them than they thought.

Will they be able to uncover an assassin's plot before it's too late? Will Asahel be able to unearth a secret that is vital to their mission? Will Cercia survive its own revolution? In The Jealousy Glass, Perkins boldly continues a series of unforgettable characters and events that will leave you begging for more.

 

AMAZON PURCHASE LINKS:



GIVEAWAY:

In conjunction with the release of The Jealousy Glass, Gwen is running a giveaway for an autographed, first edition paperback of The Universal Mirrorthrough Goodreads at: http://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/show/37726-the-universal-mirror

The giveaway officially ends on December 21, 2012—the author's birthday and supposed date for the oncoming apocalypse.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Gwen Perkins has always regarded the deep rainforest of the Olympic Peninsula as the one place that she feels most at home. Gwen grew up in small towns across the Pacific Northwest, going to slug races and strawberry festivals when she wasn't scribbling on any scrap of paper she could come by. She boasts the dubious distinction of going to a public school with only eight students, learning Irish sea chanteys from a man who sang with the Clancy Brothers, and catching tadpoles during classes.

Her adult life is generally just about as much fun.

She lives in the City of Destiny (better known as Tacoma, Washington). Her hobbies include wandering beaches, baking pies and lampworking. In between all of this, Gwen has written two novels in the Artifacts of Empire series: The Universal Mirror and The Jealousy GlassThe Universal Mirror has been nominated for a 2013 Endeavour Award.

She is presently at work on future novels in the Artifacts of Empire series while working on another series in collaboration with Wilson Fabián Saravia.

SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS:

Twitter: @helleder

Want more?  Here's an excerpt from the print version of the novel The Jealousy Glass:

From Chapter 5

"You're not the only one who was trapped, you realize."  Felix said.  Asahel glanced up, taking a few extra steps to catch up with the quick pace that Felix set.  "We were all trapped by the Heresies.  Any law that prohibited you was held over my head from the time I was born."
           
The Heresies were laws that bound magicians alone.  Among them, the foremost being the prohibition against using magic against humans, whether to harm or to heal.  Other Heresies governed more mundane areas—using magic to steal or to read another's thoughts without their consent was forbidden.  Each Heresy was enforced by the Council—or had been.  Quentin's ascension had changed all of that.  Now the Heresies were in flux and no magician knew quite what laws governed their behavior. 

Old habits die hard.  Asahel wondered whether the old rules had been put back into place after the Serenissma had left port.  He found himself remembering something that they'd been told in university—that the Heresies themselves changed depending on the spirit of the age. 
           
"Heresy.  It's such an odd word," he murmured, wondering if Cercia had found itself in another time of transition. 
           
"Not so odd, considering.  We had a god...once."
           
"And then he was killed."  Asahel became even more thoughtful.  "No one ever questions that either.  Just like no one questioned why we had laws that prevented us from using magic on living beings."
           
Felix turned to Asahel and smiled.
           
"I thought you'd be done with dangerous questions," he replied.  Asahel ducked his head, glancing over at the bushes as he tried to think of a suitable response.
           
"Someone ought to ask," he said finally.
           
"And why?"  Felix countered.  "So we can create new gods?  Or should we come here to seek them out?  If we take their beliefs for our own, then there's no point to war, is there?  We'll already have given them the best of our country."
           
"What is that?" Asahel asked.
           
"The one freedom we had left," he said.  "The freedom not to believe.  The freedom to rely on ourselves for our own morality and to know for certain that our goodness came from ourselves and not some distant unknown."
           
"And you believe faith in a god would erase that?"  He wasn’t sure himself what he believed.  Everyone grew up with the stories of the dark times when Cercians had worshiped a vengeful god.  Everyone knew the consequences.  The idea was so distant that Asahel considered it little more than an idle theory to pass the time.
           
It was clear that Felix had thought about it more often as he answered, "Yes, I do."
           
"I don’t think so," the younger man said.  "People are the same whether they believe in a higher being or not.  I shouldn’t see that having a god absolves anyone of responsibility.  Rather, it ought to give them more of it."
           
Felix laughed.  "I hope you’ve the right of it, Soames."





2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : The Jealousy Glass (Artifacts of Empire)
link : The Jealousy Glass (Artifacts of Empire)

Read Also


2012

Today I'm participating in a blog blitz for Gwen Perkins's new novel The Jealousy Glass (Artifacts of Empire).  There are all sorts of goodies below, so please check them out!

"We came to stop a war before it came to Cercia.  And it seems the war has come to us."

Responsibility and patriotism spur Cercia's new leader, Quentin, to protect his beloved country at all costs and he assigns Asahel and Felix to serve as ambassadors and secret agents to Anjdur. Their journey quickly turns awry and Asahel and Felix barely escape a devastating shipwreck, walk a tightrope of political tension, and rescue an empress before they learn they must face an enemy closer to them than they thought.

Will they be able to uncover an assassin's plot before it's too late? Will Asahel be able to unearth a secret that is vital to their mission? Will Cercia survive its own revolution? In The Jealousy Glass, Perkins boldly continues a series of unforgettable characters and events that will leave you begging for more.

 

AMAZON PURCHASE LINKS:



GIVEAWAY:

In conjunction with the release of The Jealousy Glass, Gwen is running a giveaway for an autographed, first edition paperback of The Universal Mirrorthrough Goodreads at: http://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/show/37726-the-universal-mirror

The giveaway officially ends on December 21, 2012—the author's birthday and supposed date for the oncoming apocalypse.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Gwen Perkins has always regarded the deep rainforest of the Olympic Peninsula as the one place that she feels most at home. Gwen grew up in small towns across the Pacific Northwest, going to slug races and strawberry festivals when she wasn't scribbling on any scrap of paper she could come by. She boasts the dubious distinction of going to a public school with only eight students, learning Irish sea chanteys from a man who sang with the Clancy Brothers, and catching tadpoles during classes.

Her adult life is generally just about as much fun.

She lives in the City of Destiny (better known as Tacoma, Washington). Her hobbies include wandering beaches, baking pies and lampworking. In between all of this, Gwen has written two novels in the Artifacts of Empire series: The Universal Mirror and The Jealousy GlassThe Universal Mirror has been nominated for a 2013 Endeavour Award.

She is presently at work on future novels in the Artifacts of Empire series while working on another series in collaboration with Wilson Fabián Saravia.

SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS:

Twitter: @helleder

Want more?  Here's an excerpt from the print version of the novel The Jealousy Glass:

From Chapter 5

"You're not the only one who was trapped, you realize."  Felix said.  Asahel glanced up, taking a few extra steps to catch up with the quick pace that Felix set.  "We were all trapped by the Heresies.  Any law that prohibited you was held over my head from the time I was born."
           
The Heresies were laws that bound magicians alone.  Among them, the foremost being the prohibition against using magic against humans, whether to harm or to heal.  Other Heresies governed more mundane areas—using magic to steal or to read another's thoughts without their consent was forbidden.  Each Heresy was enforced by the Council—or had been.  Quentin's ascension had changed all of that.  Now the Heresies were in flux and no magician knew quite what laws governed their behavior. 

Old habits die hard.  Asahel wondered whether the old rules had been put back into place after the Serenissma had left port.  He found himself remembering something that they'd been told in university—that the Heresies themselves changed depending on the spirit of the age. 
           
"Heresy.  It's such an odd word," he murmured, wondering if Cercia had found itself in another time of transition. 
           
"Not so odd, considering.  We had a god...once."
           
"And then he was killed."  Asahel became even more thoughtful.  "No one ever questions that either.  Just like no one questioned why we had laws that prevented us from using magic on living beings."
           
Felix turned to Asahel and smiled.
           
"I thought you'd be done with dangerous questions," he replied.  Asahel ducked his head, glancing over at the bushes as he tried to think of a suitable response.
           
"Someone ought to ask," he said finally.
           
"And why?"  Felix countered.  "So we can create new gods?  Or should we come here to seek them out?  If we take their beliefs for our own, then there's no point to war, is there?  We'll already have given them the best of our country."
           
"What is that?" Asahel asked.
           
"The one freedom we had left," he said.  "The freedom not to believe.  The freedom to rely on ourselves for our own morality and to know for certain that our goodness came from ourselves and not some distant unknown."
           
"And you believe faith in a god would erase that?"  He wasn’t sure himself what he believed.  Everyone grew up with the stories of the dark times when Cercians had worshiped a vengeful god.  Everyone knew the consequences.  The idea was so distant that Asahel considered it little more than an idle theory to pass the time.
           
It was clear that Felix had thought about it more often as he answered, "Yes, I do."
           
"I don’t think so," the younger man said.  "People are the same whether they believe in a higher being or not.  I shouldn’t see that having a god absolves anyone of responsibility.  Rather, it ought to give them more of it."
           
Felix laughed.  "I hope you’ve the right of it, Soames."





Sunday, November 18, 2012

Do You See What I See?

I'm a visual writer;  I like to imagine a scene playing out like a movie in my head before I put it 'on paper.'  A problem with this is that I'll fail to adequately transcribe my imagined scene onto the printed page.  It can be difficult during self-editing to filter out what I've already visualized (i.e., to put myself in the reader's shoes and only 'see' what the words describe).  Since I've already 'pictured' what happens, my brain fills in the pieces that my words haven't adequately detailed, and even though I'm imagining a completed scene in my head based on what I'm reading, what's actually on the page has gaps.

I've developed a 'trick' to help myself with this problem.  It's nothing complicated and is extremely simple, if not overtly obvious, but I've found it does help me. After I've finished writing a scene, I'll do a re-read with a piece of scrap paper handy. As I'm reading, I sketch out the scene that the page paints, drawing only what the words describe.  I'm not talking about an artistic sketch--just stick figures and basic shapes will do.  This little diagram visually illustrates to me what I've described for the reader.  And if the picture is incomplete, I know where to add written detail.

Here's a quick example, using the paragraph below:
“Hate unnaturals,” Yduk Thiern murmured.  “Always have, always will.”  He stroked a hairy mole on his chin, while his boot sole slid back and forth across the desiccated surface of a coney skull rotting in the brushwood.
     
The bashful breeze ruffled not a hair on Yduk’s eggshell-bald head.  His greasy moustache hung too heavy to be bothered by a timid zephyr.  Clad in burnished black-lacquered buckskin, he wore a hand-and-a-half sword on his hip and a crossbow over his shoulder.  Dwarfed by the larger weapons, a deadly-thin dagger also hung at his belt.  He stood unmoving—tall, lean, and hard—blending with the shadows. 
     
Now, past midnight on a cool summer’s eve in the low foothills south of Dwim-Halloe, he waited beneath an ancient Elven tree-tower.  An unnatural lived inside.
     
In the oak forest sprinkled with whitebeam and wych elm, a giant ash loomed overhead, silvery bark magnificent in the moonlight.  Long ago, the elves constructed a slender dwelling wound around the trunk, high in the concealing branches.
     
Now the elves were gone, and a fugitive mage resided in the woodland spire.  The Southlander intended to collect his bounty.
     
The tracker scrutinized the rangy tree.  With no ladder or low branches, he wondered how he would ascend to the elevated entrance of the unnatural’s dwelling.
I would have the following sketch (please, control your laughter--it's for illustration purposes only!):


The sketch above is the imagery you can expect your readers to 'see' if they catch all of your descriptive text.  If this doesn't match the movie in your head, or something important is not shown, now is the time to fix it.
2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Do You See What I See?
link : Do You See What I See?

Read Also


2012

I'm a visual writer;  I like to imagine a scene playing out like a movie in my head before I put it 'on paper.'  A problem with this is that I'll fail to adequately transcribe my imagined scene onto the printed page.  It can be difficult during self-editing to filter out what I've already visualized (i.e., to put myself in the reader's shoes and only 'see' what the words describe).  Since I've already 'pictured' what happens, my brain fills in the pieces that my words haven't adequately detailed, and even though I'm imagining a completed scene in my head based on what I'm reading, what's actually on the page has gaps.

I've developed a 'trick' to help myself with this problem.  It's nothing complicated and is extremely simple, if not overtly obvious, but I've found it does help me. After I've finished writing a scene, I'll do a re-read with a piece of scrap paper handy. As I'm reading, I sketch out the scene that the page paints, drawing only what the words describe.  I'm not talking about an artistic sketch--just stick figures and basic shapes will do.  This little diagram visually illustrates to me what I've described for the reader.  And if the picture is incomplete, I know where to add written detail.

Here's a quick example, using the paragraph below:

“Hate unnaturals,” Yduk Thiern murmured.  “Always have, always will.”  He stroked a hairy mole on his chin, while his boot sole slid back and forth across the desiccated surface of a coney skull rotting in the brushwood.
     
The bashful breeze ruffled not a hair on Yduk’s eggshell-bald head.  His greasy moustache hung too heavy to be bothered by a timid zephyr.  Clad in burnished black-lacquered buckskin, he wore a hand-and-a-half sword on his hip and a crossbow over his shoulder.  Dwarfed by the larger weapons, a deadly-thin dagger also hung at his belt.  He stood unmoving—tall, lean, and hard—blending with the shadows. 
     
Now, past midnight on a cool summer’s eve in the low foothills south of Dwim-Halloe, he waited beneath an ancient Elven tree-tower.  An unnatural lived inside.
     
In the oak forest sprinkled with whitebeam and wych elm, a giant ash loomed overhead, silvery bark magnificent in the moonlight.  Long ago, the elves constructed a slender dwelling wound around the trunk, high in the concealing branches.
     
Now the elves were gone, and a fugitive mage resided in the woodland spire.  The Southlander intended to collect his bounty.
     
The tracker scrutinized the rangy tree.  With no ladder or low branches, he wondered how he would ascend to the elevated entrance of the unnatural’s dwelling.
I would have the following sketch (please, control your laughter--it's for illustration purposes only!):


The sketch above is the imagery you can expect your readers to 'see' if they catch all of your descriptive text.  If this doesn't match the movie in your head, or something important is not shown, now is the time to fix it.

Thursday, November 8, 2012

Rabid Readers Reviews

I was preparing a post updating my progress in soliciting legitimate ebook reviews by independent bloggers.  Counting my sent e-mails last night, I found approximately 64 requests I've made since August.  Of these requests, I have not yet seen a review, though I've heard back from many that they're currently reading it, or it's in their queue.  Please note, this isn't a gripe or complaint; I understand these people have a backlog of requests and I appreciate anything that someone is doing for free.  I'm posting the information here so you, dear reader, have an idea what to expect should you do the same (Disclaimer:  individual results may vary).

However, upon checking my e-mail this morning, I found a Google Alert indicating Crimson & Cream had been reviewed  by Rabid Readers Reviews, who was actually not one of the 64 requests in my outbox.  Anyhow, I was surprised and delighted (and a little nervous to read the review).  So without further adieu, here's the link to Rabid Readers Reviews.  Don't worry--I'll wait.

Done reading the review?  If by any chance that entices you to read Crimson & Cream, there are four free copies available at OnlyIndie.  Or you're welcome to purchase a copy (for which I would be most grateful) at any of these fine retailers:

Barnes & Noble bn.com

2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Rabid Readers Reviews
link : Rabid Readers Reviews

Read Also


2012

I was preparing a post updating my progress in soliciting legitimate ebook reviews by independent bloggers.  Counting my sent e-mails last night, I found approximately 64 requests I've made since August.  Of these requests, I have not yet seen a review, though I've heard back from many that they're currently reading it, or it's in their queue.  Please note, this isn't a gripe or complaint; I understand these people have a backlog of requests and I appreciate anything that someone is doing for free.  I'm posting the information here so you, dear reader, have an idea what to expect should you do the same (Disclaimer:  individual results may vary).

However, upon checking my e-mail this morning, I found a Google Alert indicating Crimson & Cream had been reviewed  by Rabid Readers Reviews, who was actually not one of the 64 requests in my outbox.  Anyhow, I was surprised and delighted (and a little nervous to read the review).  So without further adieu, here's the link to Rabid Readers Reviews.  Don't worry--I'll wait.

Done reading the review?  If by any chance that entices you to read Crimson & Cream, there are four free copies available at OnlyIndie.  Or you're welcome to purchase a copy (for which I would be most grateful) at any of these fine retailers:

Barnes & Noble bn.com

Monday, November 5, 2012

StoryBundle - What is it?

StoryBundle is another interesting indie ebook site I've recently experimented with.  I'll give it the usual treatment below:

Website Name & Link:  StoryBundle

What it's About (in their own words):
StoryBundle is a way for people who love to read to discover quality indie books written by indie authors. You know how it's always hard to find something good to read? StoryBundle hopes to solve that.

We take a handful of books—usually about five or so—and group them together to offer as a bundle. Then you, the reader, can take a look at the titles we've chosen and decide how much you'd like to pay. Think of us like a friend that scours independent books for undiscovered gems, then bundles these titles together for one low price that you decide. Yeah, we mean it; you get to set the price that you want to pay!
How it Works:  Founded in early 2012, StoryBundle features indie authors from all different genres.  They choose authors and read the titles themselves, to ensure a level of quality in the books they bundle.  If you're an author with a book you'd like to have included in a bundle, you can e-mail StoryBundle with a request (which is what I did).  They e-mailed back requesting a mobi file to evaluate.  Now I'm waiting with my fingers crossed that I get included in a bundle.  I'll post here if I do.

StoryBundle has a great FAQ and a lot of neat features, like allowing the reader to 'pick your price' and donate a portion to charity, among other things. Regardless of the amount a bundle sells for, the author receives 70%.  Check it out when you have a chance.


2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : StoryBundle - What is it?
link : StoryBundle - What is it?

Read Also


2012

StoryBundle is another interesting indie ebook site I've recently experimented with.  I'll give it the usual treatment below:

Website Name & Link:  StoryBundle

What it's About (in their own words):

StoryBundle is a way for people who love to read to discover quality indie books written by indie authors. You know how it's always hard to find something good to read? StoryBundle hopes to solve that.

We take a handful of books—usually about five or so—and group them together to offer as a bundle. Then you, the reader, can take a look at the titles we've chosen and decide how much you'd like to pay. Think of us like a friend that scours independent books for undiscovered gems, then bundles these titles together for one low price that you decide. Yeah, we mean it; you get to set the price that you want to pay!
How it Works:  Founded in early 2012, StoryBundle features indie authors from all different genres.  They choose authors and read the titles themselves, to ensure a level of quality in the books they bundle.  If you're an author with a book you'd like to have included in a bundle, you can e-mail StoryBundle with a request (which is what I did).  They e-mailed back requesting a mobi file to evaluate.  Now I'm waiting with my fingers crossed that I get included in a bundle.  I'll post here if I do.

StoryBundle has a great FAQ and a lot of neat features, like allowing the reader to 'pick your price' and donate a portion to charity, among other things. Regardless of the amount a bundle sells for, the author receives 70%.  Check it out when you have a chance.


Monday, October 29, 2012

Page99Test - What is it?

Continually scouring the internet for free ways to self-market my indie ebook Crimson & Cream, I've uncovered yet another interesting site.  I've already tried it and I'll tell you what I think.

Website Name:  Page99Test

What it's About (in their own words):
For decades, readers have used the Page 99 Test to judge the writing of a book before buying it. That's the idea here... but with a twist.
Here, published and unpublished writers share their page 99s with readers like you. And you get to rate their writing (without knowing if it's published or who the author is). It's fast. Fun. Addictive.
Page99Test

How it Works:  Founded in 2010, Page 99 Test lets you read one page (you guessed it--page 99!) from a random, anonymous book. After you read the page, you're prompted to answer three questions:
  1. Would you Turn the Page?
  2. Tell the writer why or why not.
  3. Based on what you read, how likely are you to buy this book?
Your responses to these three questions are then posted with the other comments on a summary-type page for the respective book. After submitting your mini-review, you're also able to read a synopsis of the book and an author-provided link, which may be to their website, Amazon book page, etc.  You can set your profile to limit which book genres you'd like to appear, if you're interested in reading only certain genres.

As an author, you can upload up to three 'page 99s' for people to read and review.  Technically, you don't have to upload page 99 specifically, but there is a character limit, so whatever you decide to put up can only be the equivalent of one page of text.  The site is monitored so rude or antagonistic comments are removed.

I uploaded page 99 (it's a little difficult to pinpoint page 99 exactly from an ebook, but I did my best).  So far, I have no comments, and must admit, I'm nervous about the feedback.  I've already reviewed five other pages, and with the exception of one, had some constructive criticism for the authors.  Hopefully I can take it as well as I dish it out (I tried my best to be helpful while being honest).  I must admit, it was addictive, and did get my juices flowing as far as wanting to write more of Book Two of The Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy (as yet unnamed).

Anyone can upload a page to be reviewed, even if it's not published anywhere.  Four of the five pages I sampled were self-published indie authors.  The fifth was an unpublished excerpt.  I decided to read only fantasy excerpts for now, and admit there was a pretty wide range of quality and content in the five samples I read.  I'll definitely be doing more reviewing, and possibly putting up another page 99 or two from my yet unpublished work.

If you have a minute, check it out.  You might have fun!  Page99Test
2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Page99Test - What is it?
link : Page99Test - What is it?

Read Also


2012

Continually scouring the internet for free ways to self-market my indie ebook Crimson & Cream, I've uncovered yet another interesting site.  I've already tried it and I'll tell you what I think.

Website Name:  Page99Test

What it's About (in their own words):

For decades, readers have used the Page 99 Test to judge the writing of a book before buying it. That's the idea here... but with a twist.
Here, published and unpublished writers share their page 99s with readers like you. And you get to rate their writing (without knowing if it's published or who the author is). It's fast. Fun. Addictive.
Page99Test

How it Works:  Founded in 2010, Page 99 Test lets you read one page (you guessed it--page 99!) from a random, anonymous book. After you read the page, you're prompted to answer three questions:
  1. Would you Turn the Page?
  2. Tell the writer why or why not.
  3. Based on what you read, how likely are you to buy this book?
Your responses to these three questions are then posted with the other comments on a summary-type page for the respective book. After submitting your mini-review, you're also able to read a synopsis of the book and an author-provided link, which may be to their website, Amazon book page, etc.  You can set your profile to limit which book genres you'd like to appear, if you're interested in reading only certain genres.

As an author, you can upload up to three 'page 99s' for people to read and review.  Technically, you don't have to upload page 99 specifically, but there is a character limit, so whatever you decide to put up can only be the equivalent of one page of text.  The site is monitored so rude or antagonistic comments are removed.

I uploaded page 99 (it's a little difficult to pinpoint page 99 exactly from an ebook, but I did my best).  So far, I have no comments, and must admit, I'm nervous about the feedback.  I've already reviewed five other pages, and with the exception of one, had some constructive criticism for the authors.  Hopefully I can take it as well as I dish it out (I tried my best to be helpful while being honest).  I must admit, it was addictive, and did get my juices flowing as far as wanting to write more of Book Two of The Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy (as yet unnamed).

Anyone can upload a page to be reviewed, even if it's not published anywhere.  Four of the five pages I sampled were self-published indie authors.  The fifth was an unpublished excerpt.  I decided to read only fantasy excerpts for now, and admit there was a pretty wide range of quality and content in the five samples I read.  I'll definitely be doing more reviewing, and possibly putting up another page 99 or two from my yet unpublished work.

If you have a minute, check it out.  You might have fun!  Page99Test

Thursday, October 25, 2012

Reviews for Indie Books

Book reviewers are a hot commodity these days.  With hundreds of thousands self-published books all craving attention, book reviewers have been flooded.  As one of those authors with an attention-starved book, I've been scouring the internet for reviewers, and I've found quite a few.  Today, however, I stumbled upon a really great site I wanted to share with you here.

But first, a little soap-boxing from me.  As the self-publishing boom with it's resulting feeding frenzy for book reviewers hit, there have been some casualties.  Bad apples have made the path for the mature, professional, well-behaved self-published author a little tougher.  Due to bad indie author behavior, many reviewers have stopped accepting self-published books.

So, before tearing off on these links and requesting a hundred reviews, please, please, please remember to read the review policy.  Can't find it?  Look harder, it may not be in an obvious or easy-to-find place, but most reviewers have one, somewhere.  And if they don't, so be it, but at least commit to the due diligence of looking for it.

All right, I'm stepping off the box.  Here's a blurb from the website I was so excited to find:
As an indie/self-published author, getting a book review can be very difficult. . . . At the Indie Book Blog Database you can find hundreds of well-established book blogs that will read and review your books for free! That’s right for free! You may not get your books reviewed over night, many of the reviewers here get flooded with review requests. One thing you have to remember: This is a free service and many reviewers do this for a hobby.
Thank you Jennifer for this great website!  Indie Book Blog Database
2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Reviews for Indie Books
link : Reviews for Indie Books

Read Also


2012

Book reviewers are a hot commodity these days.  With hundreds of thousands self-published books all craving attention, book reviewers have been flooded.  As one of those authors with an attention-starved book, I've been scouring the internet for reviewers, and I've found quite a few.  Today, however, I stumbled upon a really great site I wanted to share with you here.

But first, a little soap-boxing from me.  As the self-publishing boom with it's resulting feeding frenzy for book reviewers hit, there have been some casualties.  Bad apples have made the path for the mature, professional, well-behaved self-published author a little tougher.  Due to bad indie author behavior, many reviewers have stopped accepting self-published books.

So, before tearing off on these links and requesting a hundred reviews, please, please, please remember to read the review policy.  Can't find it?  Look harder, it may not be in an obvious or easy-to-find place, but most reviewers have one, somewhere.  And if they don't, so be it, but at least commit to the due diligence of looking for it.

All right, I'm stepping off the box.  Here's a blurb from the website I was so excited to find:

As an indie/self-published author, getting a book review can be very difficult. . . . At the Indie Book Blog Database you can find hundreds of well-established book blogs that will read and review your books for free! That’s right for free! You may not get your books reviewed over night, many of the reviewers here get flooded with review requests. One thing you have to remember: This is a free service and many reviewers do this for a hobby.
Thank you Jennifer for this great website!  Indie Book Blog Database

Monday, October 22, 2012

Progress Update

It's Monday!  Hoo-Ray (that's 100% sarcasm there folks).  In this post, I'll give some progress updates on my DIY self-publishing and ebook marketing efforts.
  • Regarding review requests, in August, I posted about soliciting book reviewers.   I e-mailed approximately 25 requests to online reviewers (and yes, I read each of their review policies, so they do review self-published fantasy ebooks).  Since August,  I've probably solicited another dozen reviewers or so.  I'm still awaiting that elusive first review (I do have one unsolicited 5-star review on Amazon.com, which is very nice).  I'm not complaining--just trying to give a realistic example of how long it can take to get your book reviewed.  So far, expect at least a couple months.
  • Regarding Book 2 of the Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy, I finished running the story through Dramatica and  have written the 1st drafts of Chapters 1 and 2, and am now working on Chapter 3.
  • Regarding sales, I've sold approximately 13 ebooks for profit (mostly on Amazon, with one on Smashwords and one at B&N).  There have been some problems/delays getting the book available on Kobo, Diesel, and Page Foundry, but Crimson & Cream should ultimately be available at these retailers as well.  I've also given away roughly 50 free copies to potential reviewers, through OnlyIndie, Operation eBook Drop, and some Smashwords coupon promotions.
  • I received an e-mail from Novelnook about an upcoming website upgrade that will allow me to see sales data on their website as well (they're currently still in beta, rolling out functions).
I'm also working on a blog post for later in the week on another new online ebook retailing opportunity.  Stay tuned!

And I forgot to mention, I recently updated my writing links page.  It's a work-in-progress, but it already contains a lot of good resources.

And finally, here's another Halloween-themed Pinterst pic:

2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Progress Update
link : Progress Update

Read Also


2012

It's Monday!  Hoo-Ray (that's 100% sarcasm there folks).  In this post, I'll give some progress updates on my DIY self-publishing and ebook marketing efforts.

  • Regarding review requests, in August, I posted about soliciting book reviewers.   I e-mailed approximately 25 requests to online reviewers (and yes, I read each of their review policies, so they do review self-published fantasy ebooks).  Since August,  I've probably solicited another dozen reviewers or so.  I'm still awaiting that elusive first review (I do have one unsolicited 5-star review on Amazon.com, which is very nice).  I'm not complaining--just trying to give a realistic example of how long it can take to get your book reviewed.  So far, expect at least a couple months.
  • Regarding Book 2 of the Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy, I finished running the story through Dramatica and  have written the 1st drafts of Chapters 1 and 2, and am now working on Chapter 3.
  • Regarding sales, I've sold approximately 13 ebooks for profit (mostly on Amazon, with one on Smashwords and one at B&N).  There have been some problems/delays getting the book available on Kobo, Diesel, and Page Foundry, but Crimson & Cream should ultimately be available at these retailers as well.  I've also given away roughly 50 free copies to potential reviewers, through OnlyIndie, Operation eBook Drop, and some Smashwords coupon promotions.
  • I received an e-mail from Novelnook about an upcoming website upgrade that will allow me to see sales data on their website as well (they're currently still in beta, rolling out functions).
I'm also working on a blog post for later in the week on another new online ebook retailing opportunity.  Stay tuned!

And I forgot to mention, I recently updated my writing links page.  It's a work-in-progress, but it already contains a lot of good resources.

And finally, here's another Halloween-themed Pinterst pic:

Friday, October 19, 2012

More 'New! What is it?' - Bublish!

I stumbled across yet another interesting new website for authors this week. Seems they're sprouting up like dandelions (but in a good way).  I've posted about OnlyIndie and Novelnook in the past few weeks, and today's topic is Bublish.

Yvonne Hertzberger at Indies Unlimited posted an excellent tutorial for Bublish on Tuesday.  I'm not going to rehash her excellent post, rather, I'll add my two-cents.  After reading Yvonne's article, I immediately had to try Bublish for myself (of course).  So I did, and here's my pair of pennies.

Bublish is still in beta, but it's functioning fine from my experience.  From the website of Serendipite Studios, the creators of Bublish:
"Bublish (™) will revolutionize the way writers share their stories and readers discover new work. We're creating the future of social book discovery . . ."
As an author, you can select excepts from your book(s) and then write a personal insight, piece of trivia, or whatever you'd like to share with a potential reader, on the book passage you selected.  From Bublish, you can share this except & insight on Facebook and Twitter.  To see an example of what a Bublish post looks like, click here.

You can sign up for Bublish as an Author or a Reader. I inadvertently signed up as a reader first; however, once you sign up as an author you also can view Bublsih as a reader (i.e., you don't need to sign up twice, even though I did--remember kids, read twice, click once).

In addition to Yvonne's user-friendly tutorial, Madison Woods posted an in-depth interview with Kathy Meis of Serendipite Studios that explains everything you might want to know about Bublish.  If you're at all curious, it's a very good read.

I'm due for an update post soon that chronicles my success (or lack thereof) with review requests, OnlyIndie, Novelnook, and the other indie self-publishing and promotion endeavors I've undertaken.  Look for that next week, and have a great weekend!

Oh yes, lest I forget, here's another pre-Halloween scare from my Pinterest page.  Boo!

Source: google.com via CM on Pinterest
2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : More 'New! What is it?' - Bublish!
link : More 'New! What is it?' - Bublish!

Read Also


2012

I stumbled across yet another interesting new website for authors this week. Seems they're sprouting up like dandelions (but in a good way).  I've posted about OnlyIndie and Novelnook in the past few weeks, and today's topic is Bublish.

Yvonne Hertzberger at Indies Unlimited posted an excellent tutorial for Bublish on Tuesday.  I'm not going to rehash her excellent post, rather, I'll add my two-cents.  After reading Yvonne's article, I immediately had to try Bublish for myself (of course).  So I did, and here's my pair of pennies.

Bublish is still in beta, but it's functioning fine from my experience.  From the website of Serendipite Studios, the creators of Bublish:

"Bublish (™) will revolutionize the way writers share their stories and readers discover new work. We're creating the future of social book discovery . . ."
As an author, you can select excepts from your book(s) and then write a personal insight, piece of trivia, or whatever you'd like to share with a potential reader, on the book passage you selected.  From Bublish, you can share this except & insight on Facebook and Twitter.  To see an example of what a Bublish post looks like, click here.

You can sign up for Bublish as an Author or a Reader. I inadvertently signed up as a reader first; however, once you sign up as an author you also can view Bublsih as a reader (i.e., you don't need to sign up twice, even though I did--remember kids, read twice, click once).

In addition to Yvonne's user-friendly tutorial, Madison Woods posted an in-depth interview with Kathy Meis of Serendipite Studios that explains everything you might want to know about Bublish.  If you're at all curious, it's a very good read.

I'm due for an update post soon that chronicles my success (or lack thereof) with review requests, OnlyIndie, Novelnook, and the other indie self-publishing and promotion endeavors I've undertaken.  Look for that next week, and have a great weekend!

Oh yes, lest I forget, here's another pre-Halloween scare from my Pinterest page.  Boo!

Source: google.com via CM on Pinterest

Monday, October 15, 2012

Novelnook - New! - What is it?

A few weeks ago I posted about my self-publishing 'experiment' with OnlyIndie.  Well, I 'Stumbled Upon' another new website catering to the eBook self-publisher.  The name of the website is Novelnook, and it's still currently in beta, with a targeted full release date in mid-November.  Based on my experience, the beta is in good shape, as everything an author needs to register and upload an eBook worked seamlessly for me.  The only requirement I didn't have was a verified PayPal account, but that wasn't a major stumbling block for me, though some may be reluctant to go this route.

As you can probably tell, I'm trying to turn every stone as far as promoting Crimson & Cream goes.  My only self-imposed caveat is that I'm exhausting all the free avenues first.  That's why I gave Novelnook a shot.  It's practically brand new, having gone from Conception to Completion in just 12 Weeks.  'What exactly is Novelbook?' you may ask.  Well, from their website:

  ". . . The internet has opened doors that have never been open before; for publishers, authors, and readers. The most recent trends have been aimed at simplifying the self-publishing process. Why? Well, quite frankly it’s cheaper, faster, and easier for authors. With eBooks on the rise, authors are scrambling to join the eBook push. However, it seems that much complexity still exists in the publishing world, even online. That’s where we come in. Novelnook – the world’s only free self-publishing eBook store. Simplified, fast, and free."

Sounds pretty good, no?  I can attest to the 'simplified, fast, and free' part, as that's exactly how it worked for me.  I started the process this morning, registered, verified my PayPal account, uploaded my book, and received a confirmation from Novelnook, and am blogging about it this afternoon.

What makes Novelbook different from other websites you're familiar with?  This caught my eye:

  "You are not required to pay a single dime to post your work and receive all of your sales in full."

This sets Novelnook apart from other self-publishing websites that let you post your eBooks for free, but take a cut of the profit.  Will the financial model work?  Time will tell.  As an author, I'm hoping it does.  But if it doesn't, I don't lose anything.  It's  clear that the self-publishing revolution is still evolving, as new business models like OnlyIndie and Novelnook try to not only break the traditional publishing model, but the existing eBook self-publishing model as well.

There's a lot more to Novelnook that my little snapshot reveals, but instead of me trying to explain everything, I'd recommend checking out the Novelnook Blog and website for more info.  I'm sure I still have a lot to learn about the website, especially with new features still planned to be rolled out.

Needless to say (yet I'll say it anyway), Crimson & Cream is now available for purchase on another website.  Like my experience with OnlyIndie, I'll keep you posted on developments with Novelnook as they progress.


2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Novelnook - New! - What is it?
link : Novelnook - New! - What is it?

Read Also


2012

A few weeks ago I posted about my self-publishing 'experiment' with OnlyIndie.  Well, I 'Stumbled Upon' another new website catering to the eBook self-publisher.  The name of the website is Novelnook, and it's still currently in beta, with a targeted full release date in mid-November.  Based on my experience, the beta is in good shape, as everything an author needs to register and upload an eBook worked seamlessly for me.  The only requirement I didn't have was a verified PayPal account, but that wasn't a major stumbling block for me, though some may be reluctant to go this route.

As you can probably tell, I'm trying to turn every stone as far as promoting Crimson & Cream goes.  My only self-imposed caveat is that I'm exhausting all the free avenues first.  That's why I gave Novelnook a shot.  It's practically brand new, having gone from Conception to Completion in just 12 Weeks.  'What exactly is Novelbook?' you may ask.  Well, from their website:

  ". . . The internet has opened doors that have never been open before; for publishers, authors, and readers. The most recent trends have been aimed at simplifying the self-publishing process. Why? Well, quite frankly it’s cheaper, faster, and easier for authors. With eBooks on the rise, authors are scrambling to join the eBook push. However, it seems that much complexity still exists in the publishing world, even online. That’s where we come in. Novelnook – the world’s only free self-publishing eBook store. Simplified, fast, and free."

Sounds pretty good, no?  I can attest to the 'simplified, fast, and free' part, as that's exactly how it worked for me.  I started the process this morning, registered, verified my PayPal account, uploaded my book, and received a confirmation from Novelnook, and am blogging about it this afternoon.

What makes Novelbook different from other websites you're familiar with?  This caught my eye:

  "You are not required to pay a single dime to post your work and receive all of your sales in full."

This sets Novelnook apart from other self-publishing websites that let you post your eBooks for free, but take a cut of the profit.  Will the financial model work?  Time will tell.  As an author, I'm hoping it does.  But if it doesn't, I don't lose anything.  It's  clear that the self-publishing revolution is still evolving, as new business models like OnlyIndie and Novelnook try to not only break the traditional publishing model, but the existing eBook self-publishing model as well.

There's a lot more to Novelnook that my little snapshot reveals, but instead of me trying to explain everything, I'd recommend checking out the Novelnook Blog and website for more info.  I'm sure I still have a lot to learn about the website, especially with new features still planned to be rolled out.

Needless to say (yet I'll say it anyway), Crimson & Cream is now available for purchase on another website.  Like my experience with OnlyIndie, I'll keep you posted on developments with Novelnook as they progress.


Friday, October 12, 2012

Heart Search Blog Tour! Guest Post by Carlie M. A. Cullen, Author of Heart Search: Lost


A Flash of Inspiration – Or Is It?

Inspiration – what does that word mean to you? In the dictionary it’s defined as: 1.Stimulation to do creative work; stimulation for the human mind to creative thought or to the making of art [found inspiration in the landscape around her]. 2. Somebody or something that inspires; somebody or something that inspires somebody to creative thought or to the making of art [His book is an inspiration to all would-be travellers]. 3. Creativeness; the quality of being stimulated to create thought or activity, or the manifestation of this [a moment of inspiration].

As writers we all need inspiration to put pen to paper or our fingers on the keyboard. Yet there’s a missing ingredient here – imagination. To me, inspiration and imagination go hand in hand, like eggs and bacon or toast and marmalade. Yes you can have eggs without the bacon or toast without the marmalade, but will it taste as good?

So let’s explore imagination for a minute. As children we had truckloads of it; we would do drawing and paintings, play with dolls or toy soldiers making things up as we went along yet as we grow into adulthood our imagination seems to get stifled by life. Yeah, sometimes it’s hard to let our imagination run riot when we’re worried about paying bills, work, and maybe we’ve got kids and a spouse. But to be a writer we need to allow our imagination out of its box and go wild.

The dictionary defines imagination as: 1. Ability to visualise; the ability to form images and ideas in the mind, especially of things never seen or experienced directly. 2. Creative part of mind; the part of the mind where ideas, thoughts and images are formed. Do you see the link between the two definitions?
Okay, so let’s put the two together and see what we get. Your scenario is – you’re out for a drive in the countryside and you come across a little church tucked away behind some trees or bushes. You’re intrigued so you stop for a closer look. It’s just a small abandoned church with weeds and overgrown grass in the yard. Or is it? Now let your imagination soar . . .

Why is the church abandoned? Perhaps it was used for pagan or satanic worship and a posse of god-fearing folk drove them out. Maybe there was a small town around the church at one time – what happened to the people and houses? Did a plague wipe out the town and the homes razed to the ground to eradicate the disease? Was there something supernatural which drove the people away, like a poltergeist? Perhaps a serial killer methodically wiped out the town, one family at a time. Did extra-terrestrials have something to do with it?

Going back to the church itself, is something hidden in the crypt, something magical? Is someone or something evil buried beneath the church? Is the crypt now used as a vampire’s resting place? And what about the churchyard – have the grass and weeds been allowed to grow wild to hide something? If so, what could it be? Do some of the gravestones hide clues to a secret treasure or symbols to summon demonic forces.

Now you’ve let your imagination picture all these possibilities for a simple abandoned church, you have created the inspiration to work some magic with it. Now you can grab your keyboard or pad and pen and begin to sketch out a story. Once you’ve decided which scenario you’re going to write about you can then start thinking about characters and building your plot.

Anything you see, no matter how ordinary can be made extraordinary just by using your imagination. This also applies to people. A man walking down the street looking shabby could be a millionaire, a celebrity in disguise, a spy, a witch hunter, a wizard or a homeless ex-soldier.

If you struggle to find inspiration for your writing it’s probably because you’re not allowing your imagination to feed it. So as you travel to work, walk down the shops or in the country or drive somewhere in your car, really open your eyes, let your imagination take flight and allow yourself to be inspired.

Carlie M A Cullen was born in London. She grew up in Hertfordshire where she first discovered her love of books and writing. She has been an administrator and marketer all her working life and is also a professional teacher of Ballroom and Latin American dancing.

Carlie has always written in some form or another, but Heart Search: Lost is her first novel. This was launched 8thOctober 2012 through Myrddin Publishing Group and work has started on book two: Heart Search: Found. She writes mainly in the Fantasy/Paranormal Romance genres for YA, New Adult and Adult.

Carlie is also a professional editor.

Carlie also holds the reins of a writing group called Writebulb. Their first anthology, The Other Way Is Essex, was published September 2012 under Myrddin Publishing Group.

Carlie currently lives in Essex, UK with her daughter.


2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Heart Search Blog Tour! Guest Post by Carlie M. A. Cullen, Author of Heart Search: Lost
link : Heart Search Blog Tour! Guest Post by Carlie M. A. Cullen, Author of Heart Search: Lost

Read Also


2012


A Flash of Inspiration – Or Is It?

Inspiration – what does that word mean to you? In the dictionary it’s defined as: 1.Stimulation to do creative work; stimulation for the human mind to creative thought or to the making of art [found inspiration in the landscape around her]. 2. Somebody or something that inspires; somebody or something that inspires somebody to creative thought or to the making of art [His book is an inspiration to all would-be travellers]. 3. Creativeness; the quality of being stimulated to create thought or activity, or the manifestation of this [a moment of inspiration].

As writers we all need inspiration to put pen to paper or our fingers on the keyboard. Yet there’s a missing ingredient here – imagination. To me, inspiration and imagination go hand in hand, like eggs and bacon or toast and marmalade. Yes you can have eggs without the bacon or toast without the marmalade, but will it taste as good?

So let’s explore imagination for a minute. As children we had truckloads of it; we would do drawing and paintings, play with dolls or toy soldiers making things up as we went along yet as we grow into adulthood our imagination seems to get stifled by life. Yeah, sometimes it’s hard to let our imagination run riot when we’re worried about paying bills, work, and maybe we’ve got kids and a spouse. But to be a writer we need to allow our imagination out of its box and go wild.

The dictionary defines imagination as: 1. Ability to visualise; the ability to form images and ideas in the mind, especially of things never seen or experienced directly. 2. Creative part of mind; the part of the mind where ideas, thoughts and images are formed. Do you see the link between the two definitions?
Okay, so let’s put the two together and see what we get. Your scenario is – you’re out for a drive in the countryside and you come across a little church tucked away behind some trees or bushes. You’re intrigued so you stop for a closer look. It’s just a small abandoned church with weeds and overgrown grass in the yard. Or is it? Now let your imagination soar . . .

Why is the church abandoned? Perhaps it was used for pagan or satanic worship and a posse of god-fearing folk drove them out. Maybe there was a small town around the church at one time – what happened to the people and houses? Did a plague wipe out the town and the homes razed to the ground to eradicate the disease? Was there something supernatural which drove the people away, like a poltergeist? Perhaps a serial killer methodically wiped out the town, one family at a time. Did extra-terrestrials have something to do with it?

Going back to the church itself, is something hidden in the crypt, something magical? Is someone or something evil buried beneath the church? Is the crypt now used as a vampire’s resting place? And what about the churchyard – have the grass and weeds been allowed to grow wild to hide something? If so, what could it be? Do some of the gravestones hide clues to a secret treasure or symbols to summon demonic forces.

Now you’ve let your imagination picture all these possibilities for a simple abandoned church, you have created the inspiration to work some magic with it. Now you can grab your keyboard or pad and pen and begin to sketch out a story. Once you’ve decided which scenario you’re going to write about you can then start thinking about characters and building your plot.

Anything you see, no matter how ordinary can be made extraordinary just by using your imagination. This also applies to people. A man walking down the street looking shabby could be a millionaire, a celebrity in disguise, a spy, a witch hunter, a wizard or a homeless ex-soldier.

If you struggle to find inspiration for your writing it’s probably because you’re not allowing your imagination to feed it. So as you travel to work, walk down the shops or in the country or drive somewhere in your car, really open your eyes, let your imagination take flight and allow yourself to be inspired.

Carlie M A Cullen was born in London. She grew up in Hertfordshire where she first discovered her love of books and writing. She has been an administrator and marketer all her working life and is also a professional teacher of Ballroom and Latin American dancing.

Carlie has always written in some form or another, but Heart Search: Lost is her first novel. This was launched 8thOctober 2012 through Myrddin Publishing Group and work has started on book two: Heart Search: Found. She writes mainly in the Fantasy/Paranormal Romance genres for YA, New Adult and Adult.

Carlie is also a professional editor.

Carlie also holds the reins of a writing group called Writebulb. Their first anthology, The Other Way Is Essex, was published September 2012 under Myrddin Publishing Group.

Carlie currently lives in Essex, UK with her daughter.


Friday, October 5, 2012

Keeping Promises/Updates

Today I'll try to catch up on all the self-publishing, DIY, work-in-progress activities I said I would keep you updated on.  So here they are:
  • eBook Review Requests:  On August 21, I posted about soliciting book reviewers.   I e-mailed approximately 25 requests to online book reviewers to see if they would be interested in reading and reviewing Crimson & Cream.  From the initial batch of requests, 7 people indicating they were adding my ebook to their list.  So far, still no reviews to share with you (it's been about 6 weeks since my requests went out).
  • Although I think it goes without saying, it probably can't hurt to let you know I am working on Book 2 of the Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy.  I'll keep posting little progress reports here as I go.  Currently, I have the plot laid out and am working on chapter summary sheets.  I'm planning on using Dramatica again (like I did on Crimson & Cream), so that will be my next step, once I have the chapter essentials finished.
As always, if you have any questions, please let me know.  Have a great weekend!

I'll leave you with a little Pinterest peek:

Source: google.com via CM on Pinterest
2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Keeping Promises/Updates
link : Keeping Promises/Updates

Read Also


2012

Today I'll try to catch up on all the self-publishing, DIY, work-in-progress activities I said I would keep you updated on.  So here they are:

  • eBook Review Requests:  On August 21, I posted about soliciting book reviewers.   I e-mailed approximately 25 requests to online book reviewers to see if they would be interested in reading and reviewing Crimson & Cream.  From the initial batch of requests, 7 people indicating they were adding my ebook to their list.  So far, still no reviews to share with you (it's been about 6 weeks since my requests went out).
  • Although I think it goes without saying, it probably can't hurt to let you know I am working on Book 2 of the Oxbow Kingdom Trilogy.  I'll keep posting little progress reports here as I go.  Currently, I have the plot laid out and am working on chapter summary sheets.  I'm planning on using Dramatica again (like I did on Crimson & Cream), so that will be my next step, once I have the chapter essentials finished.
As always, if you have any questions, please let me know.  Have a great weekend!

I'll leave you with a little Pinterest peek:

Source: google.com via CM on Pinterest

Thursday, October 4, 2012

Operation eBook Drop

I recently joined something called Operation eBook Drop, which is, according to the creator Edward C. Patterson"an affiliation of independent authors and soldiers."

Via Operation eBook Drop, indie authors offer their ebooks for free to coalition troops deployed overseas.  Troops contact Operation eBook Drop with their e-mail and a request to be included on the free ebook mailing list.  Each author is responsible for getting their book coupons (generally via Smashwords) to the military members.  Mr. Patterson provides the authors with an e-mail list of soldiers to send the free ebook information to.  The list of e-mail addresses I received had over 400 soldiers on it.

Although I think it's a generous thing for authors to do, it's certainly not strictly a philanthropic effort.  For a new self-published author like myself, it provides an outlet to reach new readers and build a following.  It's definitely a win-win opportunity for both readers and authors.

If you're interested in learning more, the Smashwords Blog has an excellent post on Operation eBook Drop and the official website can be found here:  Operation eBook Drop.


2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Operation eBook Drop
link : Operation eBook Drop

Read Also


2012

I recently joined something called Operation eBook Drop, which is, according to the creator Edward C. Patterson"an affiliation of independent authors and soldiers."

Via Operation eBook Drop, indie authors offer their ebooks for free to coalition troops deployed overseas.  Troops contact Operation eBook Drop with their e-mail and a request to be included on the free ebook mailing list.  Each author is responsible for getting their book coupons (generally via Smashwords) to the military members.  Mr. Patterson provides the authors with an e-mail list of soldiers to send the free ebook information to.  The list of e-mail addresses I received had over 400 soldiers on it.

Although I think it's a generous thing for authors to do, it's certainly not strictly a philanthropic effort.  For a new self-published author like myself, it provides an outlet to reach new readers and build a following.  It's definitely a win-win opportunity for both readers and authors.

If you're interested in learning more, the Smashwords Blog has an excellent post on Operation eBook Drop and the official website can be found here:  Operation eBook Drop.


Sunday, September 30, 2012

Video Trailer for Crimson & Cream, with some DIY tips . . .


Video Trailer for Crimson & Cream

For all you DIY'ers out there, here's how I made this video for free (i.e., at no cost to me):

  1. I used Windows Live Movie Maker software (but any good movie editing software will do).
  2. I used CCFinder (free version) to locate online photographs that are free under the Creative Commons (CC) license.  Obviously, you can also use your own art, which I did as well.
  3. I used Photo Pos Pro to edit enhance the images I used (this is an optional step).
  4. I selected a song from the excellent composer Kevin MacLeod, who has a large collection of royalty-free CC licensed Music available at Incompetech.com.
It takes some trial-and-error to get the music to sync with the photos, but with a little tinkering, it's not too hard.  I spent an evening after work putting this together (roughly 3-4 hours, I would estimate).

Basically, all you need is movie editing software and images and music that you can legally use.  I chose Kevin MacLeod's music because I really liked it; however, there are many artists available on the internet who have royalty-free music available for download (just Google 'royalty-free music,' but please read the license terms and conditions to make sure your intended use complies).

Here's a good link for free photos:  http://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000845.htm

If you have questions, let me know, and I'll try to help.


2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Video Trailer for Crimson & Cream, with some DIY tips . . .
link : Video Trailer for Crimson & Cream, with some DIY tips . . .

Read Also


2012


Video Trailer for Crimson & Cream

For all you DIY'ers out there, here's how I made this video for free (i.e., at no cost to me):

  1. I used Windows Live Movie Maker software (but any good movie editing software will do).
  2. I used CCFinder (free version) to locate online photographs that are free under the Creative Commons (CC) license.  Obviously, you can also use your own art, which I did as well.
  3. I used Photo Pos Pro to edit enhance the images I used (this is an optional step).
  4. I selected a song from the excellent composer Kevin MacLeod, who has a large collection of royalty-free CC licensed Music available at Incompetech.com.
It takes some trial-and-error to get the music to sync with the photos, but with a little tinkering, it's not too hard.  I spent an evening after work putting this together (roughly 3-4 hours, I would estimate).

Basically, all you need is movie editing software and images and music that you can legally use.  I chose Kevin MacLeod's music because I really liked it; however, there are many artists available on the internet who have royalty-free music available for download (just Google 'royalty-free music,' but please read the license terms and conditions to make sure your intended use complies).

Here's a good link for free photos:  http://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000845.htm

If you have questions, let me know, and I'll try to help.


Sunday, September 23, 2012

Fun with Animoto!

Make your own slideshow with music at Animoto.

2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Fun with Animoto!
link : Fun with Animoto!

Read Also


2012

Make your own slideshow with music at Animoto.

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Beginner's Chronicle of Self-Publishing #5: Requesting Reviews

Here's a little statistical research-in-progress, just to give you an idea of what to expect, should you do the same.  I've e-mailed approximately 25 requests to online book reviewers to see if they would be interested in reading and reviewing Crimson & Cream.  So far, I've had 2-3 people e-mail back politely declining for various reasons.  I've also heard back from 7 people indicating they were adding my ebook to their list.  So far, no reviews, but it's been less than two weeks since I started soliciting for them.  Many reviewers estimate a backlog of a month or more before they can get to your book.  Patience is key.

Regarding online reviewers, other than Googling, these are a few reviewer lists I found.  Some of their links are dead, and some are no longer accepting reviews, but it's a good place to start.
2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Beginner's Chronicle of Self-Publishing #5: Requesting Reviews
link : Beginner's Chronicle of Self-Publishing #5: Requesting Reviews

Read Also


2012

Here's a little statistical research-in-progress, just to give you an idea of what to expect, should you do the same.  I've e-mailed approximately 25 requests to online book reviewers to see if they would be interested in reading and reviewing Crimson & Cream.  So far, I've had 2-3 people e-mail back politely declining for various reasons.  I've also heard back from 7 people indicating they were adding my ebook to their list.  So far, no reviews, but it's been less than two weeks since I started soliciting for them.  Many reviewers estimate a backlog of a month or more before they can get to your book.  Patience is key.

Regarding online reviewers, other than Googling, these are a few reviewer lists I found.  Some of their links are dead, and some are no longer accepting reviews, but it's a good place to start.

Friday, August 10, 2012

Online Editing Software (Chronicle #2)

I mentioned in a prior post that I used the AutoCrit Editing Wizard for my novel Crimson & Cream.  Before I purchased the service, I did some research on online editing tools.  They seem to be very polarizing to people, with a lot of haters.  Personally, I thought it was a helpful tool and I feel like I got my worth $77 for a year's subscription.  I'm not going to walk you through the mechanics of the service (that's all available on their website), however, I will mention some of the features I found useful:

  • Sentence Length Variation shows you the number of words in each of your sentences, and makes it easy to identify run-on sentences.
  • Repeated Words and Phrases does what it says and highlights text that is used multiple times in your document.
  • Dialogue identifies your "he said," "she said" tags, and lets you easily compare these.
It also spits out a ton of word data on your document, such as word count, average sentence length, reading level, and many others. 

One of the features I found limiting was the word count limit.  The "Platinum" package I ordered allowed the analysis of up to 8,000 words at a time.  This meant I had to analyze 2-3 chapters at a time, instead of my entire novel at once.  In retrospect, this may be somewhat of a blessing in disguise, as it forces you to look at your writing in smaller chunks.  I ended up analyzing chapter-by-chapter, which meant I cut, pasted, and analyzed 28 separate blocks of text.

In general, I think it's a great tool to ensure you have word variety in your text by pointing out your tendencies, such as overuse of certain words and phrases.  I don't want to imply that it takes the place of a good human copy reader or editor, though.

2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : Online Editing Software (Chronicle #2)
link : Online Editing Software (Chronicle #2)

Read Also


2012

I mentioned in a prior post that I used the AutoCrit Editing Wizard for my novel Crimson & Cream.  Before I purchased the service, I did some research on online editing tools.  They seem to be very polarizing to people, with a lot of haters.  Personally, I thought it was a helpful tool and I feel like I got my worth $77 for a year's subscription.  I'm not going to walk you through the mechanics of the service (that's all available on their website), however, I will mention some of the features I found useful:

  • Sentence Length Variation shows you the number of words in each of your sentences, and makes it easy to identify run-on sentences.
  • Repeated Words and Phrases does what it says and highlights text that is used multiple times in your document.
  • Dialogue identifies your "he said," "she said" tags, and lets you easily compare these.
It also spits out a ton of word data on your document, such as word count, average sentence length, reading level, and many others. 

One of the features I found limiting was the word count limit.  The "Platinum" package I ordered allowed the analysis of up to 8,000 words at a time.  This meant I had to analyze 2-3 chapters at a time, instead of my entire novel at once.  In retrospect, this may be somewhat of a blessing in disguise, as it forces you to look at your writing in smaller chunks.  I ended up analyzing chapter-by-chapter, which meant I cut, pasted, and analyzed 28 separate blocks of text.

In general, I think it's a great tool to ensure you have word variety in your text by pointing out your tendencies, such as overuse of certain words and phrases.  I don't want to imply that it takes the place of a good human copy reader or editor, though.

Thursday, August 9, 2012

A Beginner's Chronicle of Self-Publishing

I thought I'd document my progress in online self-publishing and (hopefully) selling my first ebook.  Maybe other authors would find a chronology of the process helpful, or maybe point out some of the opportunities I might be missing.  Anyway, here goes.

I finished writing a fantasy novel in 2001 that I was unable to get published after about 3 years of trying.  I liked the story and thought "Why not self-publish?"  The book was just sitting on my hard drive anyway.  Once online publishing got my attention in 2011, I decided that was the route for me.

Even though I was on my 10th draft when I decided to self-publish, I hadn't read my book in over six years, so fresh eyes instigated completion of my 11th and 12th drafts.  I wanted to have my book professionally copy read/edited, but after searching online and seeing the costs involved, I decided to self-edit the book using the AutoCrit Editing Wizard.  At $77 a year, it was much cheaper than hiring a live person.  I hope AutoCrit helped me polish my book enough to make it worthwhile.  I think it did, but time will tell.  Although I think  AutoCrit is a useful tool, it's not a magic bullet.  You still do the work in evaluating which of its recommendations to implement.

Next post, I'll give you some insight on my experience with AutoCrit.
2012 - Hello Reader of 4concpoesiaecsps, In the article you read this time with the title 2012, We have prepared this article for you to read and retrieve information therein. Hopefully the contents of postings We write this you can understand. well, happy reading.

Title : A Beginner's Chronicle of Self-Publishing
link : A Beginner's Chronicle of Self-Publishing

Read Also


2012

I thought I'd document my progress in online self-publishing and (hopefully) selling my first ebook.  Maybe other authors would find a chronology of the process helpful, or maybe point out some of the opportunities I might be missing.  Anyway, here goes.

I finished writing a fantasy novel in 2001 that I was unable to get published after about 3 years of trying.  I liked the story and thought "Why not self-publish?"  The book was just sitting on my hard drive anyway.  Once online publishing got my attention in 2011, I decided that was the route for me.

Even though I was on my 10th draft when I decided to self-publish, I hadn't read my book in over six years, so fresh eyes instigated completion of my 11th and 12th drafts.  I wanted to have my book professionally copy read/edited, but after searching online and seeing the costs involved, I decided to self-edit the book using the AutoCrit Editing Wizard.  At $77 a year, it was much cheaper than hiring a live person.  I hope AutoCrit helped me polish my book enough to make it worthwhile.  I think it did, but time will tell.  Although I think  AutoCrit is a useful tool, it's not a magic bullet.  You still do the work in evaluating which of its recommendations to implement.

Next post, I'll give you some insight on my experience with AutoCrit.